Multiple Modes of Teaching and Learning

Multiple modes of teaching and learning engage students in a holistic and liberating education that calls forth their gifts and develops their capacities for courageous and compassionate religious leadership.

Each degree candidate’s personalized educational plan enables the student to achieve competency in the 8 threshold areas through multiple modes of teaching and learning:

Courses

  • Starr King online, hybrid, and residential courses, fall and spring terms
  • Starr King Symposia and intensives in August and January
  • Starr King immersions, offered on occasion in sites around the globe
  • Graduate Theological Union courses offered in residential, online and intensive formats – open for free to all SKSM students
  • University of California, Mills College and Holy Names University courses – open for free to all SKSM degree students

Field/Contextual Education and Practice Teaching

  • Field Work and Parish internships in Unitarian Universalist congregations (internship requires participation in the field education reflection group)
  • Community/MASC Field Work and Internships in religious communities, youth work, justice and educational organizations, and community sites (internship requires participation in the field education reflection group)
  • Clinical Pastoral Education in hospitals, prisons, and social service institutions
  • Practice Teaching as a Hilda Mason Teaching Fellow, designing and offering a course through Starr King, a congregation, or a community organization

Independent Study

  • Special Reading Courses under the direction of SKSM faculty

Experiential Learning

  • Significant learning experiences and activities outside the classrooms are discussed with advisor, such as art projects, journaling, participating in a spiritual practice or a program of spiritual direction
  • Conferences, workshops, and courses offered by organizations and educational institutions outside of Starr King, the Graduate Theological Union, and UC Berkeley 

Students will be able to engage in different learning modalities:

Low Residency Learning

  • All classes taught online count as online learning and are thus low residency. These include classes taught through Starr King, through the Institute of Buddhist Studies and others in the Graduate Theological Union (GTU).
  • Hybrid Learning – Where some students are online and the professor and other students are in Berkeley. These classes count as low residency for those students not physically in the SKSM-GTU classroom.
  • Special Reading Courses: they count as low res if the students do not meet with faculty on the SKSM-GTU campus.
  • Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE), congregational or community fieldwork, parish or community internships are all examples of low residency contextual learning, as they do not take place on the SKSM-GTU campus and are not supervised by SKSM faculty.
  • Immersion courses: offered on occasion in sites around the country and the globe (e.g., US/Mexico border, Turkey, Italy, Boston, UUA General Assembly, Oakland, ChI).
  • ChI Modules: they are to be counted as low residency contextual learning, as they do not take place on the SKSM-GTU campus and are not supervised by SKSM faculty.

High Residency Learning

  • Semester-long courses, week-long January and Summer intensive courses, all count as high residency learning. Hybrid courses count as high residency only for students attending on campus, if the faculty is also teaching on campus.
  • Hybrid Learning – Where some students are online and the professor and other students are in Berkeley. These classes count as high residency for those students in the SKSM classroom, provided that the faculty is also on campus.
  • Special Reading Courses: they count as high res if the students meets with faculty on the SKSM-GTU campus.
  • One fourth of the program must be done in high residency which may be done in the intensive courses during the summer and January intensives. This is an approved exception to ATS Educational Standard, section ES.2.1.1.1 (usually ATS requires one third of the credits to be taken in high res).

More information is listed under the “Matriculation” heading under “Field Education.