Online Courses

Current School Year

Fall 2016

Faith-Rooted Organizing for Social Change

This foundational course – applicable to all vocational paths, from community organizing to parish ministry to non-profit leadership to theological scholarship – explores tools and best practices for faith-rooted organizing for social change. Paying close attention to the intersections of social issues, identities, and religious traditions, participants will draw lessons from a diversity of historical and contemporary movements, ranging from Black Lives Matter to climate justice. Merging the pastoral with the practical, students will learn to articulate their unique faith-rooted organizing style and strategize on how to take concrete, spiritually grounded action in their own congregations and communities.


Session

Fall 2016


Dates

9/6/16 – 12/16/16


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

RSFT-8405


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

Foundations of Religious Freedom in the United States

A blended learning course on the origins and development of religious liberty in the US from the colonial and founding periods to the mid-twentieth century. It offers a thorough understanding of the historical and legal foundations that currently govern the relationship of religion and government, define protection for the free exercise of religion, and provide the civic framework for living among people of all religions and none. Part of a pilot program for the Certificate in Religion in Public Life in cooperation with the Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum, http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/admissions/areas-of-study/religious-leaders. Online the Fall 2016 Semester (September–December 2016)/plus three day immersion at the RFC in Washington, DC (Oct17-19, 2016). Travel expenses are the responsibility of the students. The last day to register for the Fall 2016 semester is August 23, 2016. See more at: http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/academics/courses/. Designed and administered by Rev. Nate Walker, RFC Executive Director, supervised by Dean Lettini. (http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/contact/directory/?entry=18)


Session

Fall 2016


Dates

9/6/16 – 12/16/16


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

HSRS-8210


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

Global Religious Traditions

This course will examine the major global religions from a cross-cultural, multi-religious perspective. Taking into consideration that a course that explores many religions cannot be comprehensive, we will consider the religions from a thematic perspective by analyzing fundamental beliefs and practices in the various religious traditions. In addition, we will also examine assumptions underlying the discipline of religious studies. Students will engage through weekly readings and forum discussion, as well as other interactive learning activities, as part of the online learning community. Students of all faiths and backgrounds are invited and encouraged to enroll. Priority given to off-campus SKSM students.


Session

Fall 2016


Dates

9/6/16 – 12/16/16


Instructors


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

HR-8401


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

Illness, Health and Healing

This course invites students to listen for the voices of the ill and/or disabled, even when those voices are full of pain or have been long ignored.  Students will develop spiritual care skills and practices to promote health and healing that will enhance their ministries and their lives.  The course will draw from narrative medicine as well as scriptures and healing stories from a variety of religious traditions.


Session

Fall 2016


Dates

9/6/16 – 12/16/16


Instructors


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

PS-8450


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

Introduction to Counseling Theory

This online theory of counseling course is the first half of a two part theory-and-practicum curriculum. Students taking the online theory component must commit to the 1.5 credit practicum course that will be taught as a residential intensive during 2017 intersession.

Students will study major counseling theories, basic helping skills, and professional issues related to the counseling process. The course will foster multicultural awareness, and introduce students to culturally responsive counseling practices. We will examine intentional and unintentional oppressions and privilege, and become more aware of the biases, prejudices, microaggressions, processes of intentional and unintentional oppression and discrimination, and other culturally supported behaviors that can be detrimental to the growth of the human spirit

The course will provide the theoretical bases for students to then develop skills in the experiential intensive intersession practicum course.


Session

Fall 2016


Dates

9/6/16 – 12/16/16


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

CEPS-8410


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

1.5


Download

Religion and News Media

This course is a blended learning course will offer the following for religious leaders and introduce a diverse group of graduate students to the challenges that the media present in communicating and engaging with belief within the context of the First Amendment and freedom of religion or belief.

In order to be an effective and authoritative religious leader in a diverse democracy, lay and ordained leaders must cultivate multiple competencies and literacies. This course will help students expand religious, media and digital literacies. These competencies will be measured via multimedia engagement, key readings, videoconferences, Socratic seminars, analysis (case studies), and media production. Part of a pilot program for the Certificate in Religion in Public Life in cooperation with the Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum, http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/admissions/areas-of-study/religious-leaders. Online the Fall 2016 Semester (September–December 2016). The last day to register for the Fall 2016 semester is August 23, 2016. Travel expenses are the responsibility of the students. – See more at: http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/academics/courses/ plus three day immersion at the RFC in Washington, DC (Oct17-19, 2016). Designed and administered by Dr. Debra L. Mason, of the RFC of the Newseum, supervised by Dean Lettini. (http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/contact/directory/?entry=18)


Session

Fall 2016


Dates

9/6/16 – 12/16/16


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

HSRS-8220


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

Religious Liberty and Contemporary American Public Life

A blended course on the evolution of the First Amendment religious Freedom principles from the 1940s, through the civil rights era, to today. Participants will address contemporary issues that concern the constitutional relationship of religion and government along with current debates over the meaning of free exercise of religion. Part of a pilot program for the Certificate in Religion in Public Life offered in cooperation with the Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum, http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/admissions/areas-of-study/religious-leaders. Online the Fall 2016 Semester (September–December 2016)/plus three day immersion at the RFC in Washington, DC (Oct17-19, 2016). Travel expenses are the responsibility of the students. The last day to register for the Fall 2016 semester is August 23, 2016. See more at: http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/academics/courses/ . Designed and administered Lauren W. Herman (JD, MTS) of the RFC of the Newseum, supervised by Dean Lettini. (http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/contact/directory/?entry=23)


Session

Fall 2016


Dates

9/6/16 – 12/16/16


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

HSRS-8211


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

SKSM and Institute of Buddhist Studies: Our Co-Sponsored Courses Fall 2016

During Fall 2016, the Institute of Buddhist Studies will offer the following courses. Please note ~ we participate in the same GTU registration periods. To register for an IBS course, follow the same instructions as registering for a Starr King course. See How to Register. Most, but not all, IBS courses do not require faculty approval, so pay close attention when registering. View IBS Fall 2016 Course Listings, including:

  • HR-8160: Readings in Early Buddhist Texts with Professor Gil Fronsdal
  • HRPS-8320: Psychological Aspects of Buddhism I with Professor Richard Payne
  • HRPH-8450: Topics in Japanese Religions with Professor Lisa Grumbach

Again, the Institute of Buddhist Studies and Starr King School have different requirements for registration. For example, SKSM does not accept auditors. Although sponsored by SKSM, IBS courses follow IBS rules. Please check course descriptions carefully before registering.


Session

Fall 2016


Instructors

TBD


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Faculty Approval Required

No

The Human Right to Freedom of Religion or Belief

The course introduces students to the human right of Freedom of religion or belief (FoRB), based on a review of the conceptual and operational tools, as well as illustrative empirical evidence, necessary for further, advanced study of FoRB. FoRB is widely recognized by scholars, policymakers, and practitioners of human rights as the oldest of the universal human rights recognized under international law. Indeed, FoRB is frequently referred to as the “grandparent” of human rights and as “the first freedom” of international human rights. The course is designed from the perspective of international relations scholar-policymaker-practitioners, so that students of religious studies and/or theology, as well as religious leaders working within faith-based and non-faith-based contexts, can develop an understanding of how the human right of FoRB has come to be defined, protected, interrogated, and addressed, in a global order that remains organized according to the (evolving and problematic) political entity known as the state.

The course works from the assumption that, given the challenges and possibilities for religious leadership in the 21st century to contribute to protection of the human right of FORB, an international relations point of departure is indispensable—both as frame of reference for, and as object of constructive criticism and transformative engagement by, religious leadership.

Part of a pilot program for the Certificate in Religion in Public Life in cooperation with the Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum, http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/admissions/areas-of-study/religious-leaders. Online the Fall 2016 Semester (September–December 2016) plus three day immersion at the RFC in Washington, DC (Oct17-19, 2016). Travel expenses are the responsibility of the students. The last day to register for the Fall 2016 semester is August 23, 2016. See more at: http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/academics/courses/. Designed and administered by Dr. Elizabeth H. Prodromou, of the RFC of the Newseum, supervised by Dean Lettini. (http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/contact/directory/?entry=18)


Session

Fall 2016


Dates

9/6/16 – 12/16/16


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

RS-8404


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

Spring 2017

Dynamic Youth Ministry

This lively and interactive course grounds participants in philosophical, psychological, programmatic, ethical and theological aspects of youth ministry. Geared toward Unitarian Universalists, but open to all religious or secular affiliations, this course seeks to embody a vision of youth ministry that is a vibrant, robust, and flexible part of every congregation and community. Topics of instruction include leadership and spiritual development, professional support for youth advisors, denominational polity, adolescent life issues, building intergenerational community, and a critical analysis of different models of youth ministry and programming. A foundational course recommended for all religious leaders, both new and old to youth ministry.


Session

Spring 2017


Dates

1/30/17 – 5/12/17


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

EDFT-8462


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3

Introduction to Systems Thinking

This is an introductory course in systems thinking, a leadership model that recognizes that people, structures, and processes interact within organizational systems to foster (or restrict) organizational health. Wherever your ministry takes you: serving a congregation; working as a chaplain; supervising volunteers in a voter registration drive; even living in a cooperative or Occupy encampment, knowledge about systems thinking offers tools to respond appropriately to the needs of the system in which you find yourself.

Our study of congregations and other organizations will be rooted in a multi-cultural, anti-oppressive understanding of the intersectionality of systems and identities. Our work will also take us into less-charted territory to explore systems thinking in relation to social media and non-hierarchical (rhizomatic) organizational systems.


Session

Spring 2017


Dates

1/30/17 – 5/12/17


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

RS-8400


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3

Ministry and Family Systems

This class will develop and deepen students’ skills for engaging in family ministry in diverse congregational and community settings. Students will learn family systems theories and apply them critically and creatively in case studies, field exercises, and their own lives.  The class will draw from multi-cultural, multi-religious, multi-generational and anti-oppressive resources.  Students will also engage in spiritual practices that are designed to strengthen and support their own and others’ families in these times.


Session

Spring 2017


Dates

1/30/17 – 5/12/17


Instructors


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

PS-8269


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3

Queer Studies: Multireligious Perspective

In an increasingly changing and globalized world, the intersection of religious and queer studies is vital for understanding the construction of identities. This online course is designed to introduce you to the place given to gender, sexuality, sexual orientation, the sexual division of labor, gender role expectations, race, and ethnicity within world religions’ theo(ideo)/logical discourses. Drawing from an interdisciplinary approach you will develop a self-critical perspective on the way that sacred texts and dogmatic corpus influence the lives and spiritual practices of queer individuals and communities. Together we will explore the mutual constitution of queerness and subjectivity of religious experiences and their social and political implications towards the deconstruction of stereotypes, power dynamics, and marginalization.


Session

Spring 2017


Dates

1/30/17 – 5/12/17


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

HRRS-8421


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3

SKSM and Institute of Buddhist Studies: Our Co-Sponsored Courses Spring 2017

During Spring 2017, the Institute of Buddhist Studies will offer the following courses. Please note ~ we participate in the same GTU registration periods. To register for an IBS course, follow the same instructions as registering for a Starr King course. See How to Register. Most, but not all, IBS courses do not require faculty approval, so pay close attention when registering. View IBS Spring 2017 Course Listings, including:

  • HRPH-8488: Topics in Zen Buddhist Thought with Professor Taigen Leighton

Again, the Institute of Buddhist Studies and Starr King School have different requirements for registration. For example, SKSM does not accept auditors. Although sponsored by SKSM, IBS courses follow IBS rules. Please check course descriptions carefully before registering.


Session

Spring 2017


Instructors

TBD


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Faculty Approval Required

No

Unitarian Universalist History

This course begins with an examination of the (alleged) antecedents to Unitarianism and Universalism in pre-Reformation Europe. We begin with development of Unitarianism in Poland, Transylvania, and England, then on to that of North American Unitarianism through its classical age, the Transcendentalist development, and the various crises of identity and purpose that develop into and through the late 19th and 20th centuries. Then we turn our attention to Universalist ascendency, decline, and then consolidation with Unitarianism. Careful attention will be paid throughout to the Unitarian/Universalist social location in relationship to class, race, and gender identities, and how these sometimes enabled and sometimes impaired social justice advances.


Session

Spring 2017


Dates

1/30/17 – 5/12/17


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

HSFT-8462


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3

Previous School Year

Fall 2015

Forgiveness & Moral Repair

In this semester-long, on-line, three-unit class we will meet people from all over the world, from a variety of religious and cultural traditions, who have practiced forgiveness as a means of healing, peace and liberation. Through readings, films, and spiritual practice exercises we will develop interpersonal and pastoral skills in forgiveness. We will work on strengthening our “forgiveness muscles” and support others in doing so as well. We will also explore “the other side of forgiveness”: how we individually and collectively might apologize, repent and atone after wrong-doing. This class will be experiential, drawing on personal narratives, neuroscience, psychology, practical theology and the wisdom and practices of Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Buddhism.


Session

Fall 2015


Dates

9/8/15 – 12/18/15


Instructors


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

PS 8430


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Download

Global Religious Traditions

This course will examine the major global religions from a cross-cultural, multi-religious perspective. Taking into consideration that a course that explores many religions cannot be comprehensive, we will consider the religions from a thematic perspective by analyzing fundamental beliefs and practices in the various religious traditions. In addition, we will also examine assumptions underlying the discipline of religious studies. Students will engage through weekly readings and forum discussion, as well as other interactive learning activities, as part of the online learning community. Students of all faiths and backgrounds are invited and encouraged to enroll. Priority given to off-campus SKSM students. [Faculty approval required; 20 max enrollment. Auditors excluded]

The online education format brings with it both benefits and challenges. On the one hand, it provides greater flexibility and the opportunity for all of us to gather together in collaborative learning—no matter where we are in the world. On the other hand, certain limitations can sometimes render the format less interactive than a traditional in-person course. Taking all of this into consideration, and in the hopes of providing a lively learning experience, this course has been designed to provide as much quality interaction as possible—both with the material and with the class community. The course material will include images, video clips, and music relevant to the faith traditions we will be studying, along with the textual readings. In addition, collaborative dialogue with classmates (weekly forum postings as well as “live” discussion via Skype, phone, etc.) will hopefully create a dynamic and stimulating learning environment where we can all engage in thoughtful discussion and reflection.


Session

Fall 2015


Dates

9/8/15 – 12/18/15


Instructors


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

HR-8401


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Download

Historical Jesus – Then & Now

This course provides a general introduction through the Quest of the Historical Jesus to the life and activity of the first century revolutionary prophet. Who was Jesus before he became an object of belief and worship? Why did his movement happen right there and then? What was the “good news” that turned the ancient world upside down?

We will consider the best available canonical as well as non-canonical literary and other evidences, will examine assumptions underlying the discipline (politics of interpretation), discuss methodologies and the limits of the historical investigation and also consider and evaluate several fascinating scholarly reconstructions. We will keep a heavy emphasis on the social sciences in this class, which will help us understand how Jesus himself was embedded in a specific history and culture, and how he and his counter cultural message are relevant today in a postcolonial setting.


Session

Fall 2015


Dates

9/8/15 – 12/18/15


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

NT 8113


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

Introduction to Counter Oppressive Sociologies

Rich sociological traditions offer tools and knowledge for dismantling systems of oppression, creating social change, and building just faith communities. This course offers an introduction to the critical analysis of social behavior, organization, and institutions for faith leaders and religion scholars. Students engage foundational texts and empirical research relevant to human experience as well as religious tradition, in order to develop theoretical and substantive bodies of knowledge as well as interpretive skills. Focus areas include feminist theory, affect, postcolonial thought, biopower, social movements, and critical race theories, among others. In each weekly unit, central questions address the nature of human action; the role of State power and ideology; notions of self, “other,” and agency; and systemic oppression and social change. The course requires weekly on-line discussion and frequent live video sessions. Students complete a final project by producing a photo essay as part of an online gallery and symposium.


Session

Fall 2015


Dates

9/8/15 – 12/18/15


Instructors


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

RS 8450


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

Mental Disorders and Oppression in the US

This anti-oppression course is designed for those of us who are called to be with people who live with mental disorders. We will spend the semester together exploring the complex world of mental “illness” in the US (although we will venture abroad just a little bit). We will companion each other through the weeks – these are emotionally difficult topics, and part of what we will do in this class is support each other as we scrutinize the ways in which our culture treats people who have been given the label of “mentally ill.”

Along the way, we will gain an understanding of the recently released new DSM-5 – and the implications of the new definitions of what behavior is, and isn’t, considered pathological. We will look at intersections of oppression, using race/ethnicity; class; age; gender; institutional power as the anti-oppression framework to examine cultural definitions and treatments of people who live with “mental disorders.” We will take specific issues (e.g. therapies; treatments; pharmaceuticals; criminal justice; mental health policies; children; youth; veterans) to examine the intersections. And we will also look for hope – making sure to find positive examples wherever and whenever possible.


Session

Fall 2015


Dates

9/8/15 – 12/18/15


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

CEPS-8499


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Download

Mysticism and Social Change

This course will explore the powerful synergy between mystic spirituality and social activism. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote, “Only through an inner spiritual transformation do we gain the strength to fight vigorously the evils of the world in a humble and loving spirit.” In the urgent and troubling context of current world events, we will look to the example of “mystic-°©‐activists” from diverse cultures and faith traditions for insight and inspiration. Readings and multimedia materials will include Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim, and Indigenous sources.

The model of “mystic-°©‐activism” refers those individuals (whether self-°©‐identified as mystics or not) whose recognition of the unity of all life, and whose love for the Divine in all creation, compelled and sustained their work of peace and justice-°©‐making. Online class discussions will identify key principles, consider areas of common ground and uniqueness among those studied, and students will be encouraged to incorporate any practices and perspectives that may enrich their own lifework. The ethical implications of the mystic experience and worldview will be a focus throughout.

All of us who work and serve and struggle in the world require a regular discipline of, as Howard Thurman put it, “watering our roots” to replenish the inner spirit. Through a holistic approach of both heart and head, we will engage specific practices to nourish and sustain an ongoing commitment to anti-°©‐oppression work and ministerial service.


Session

Fall 2015


Dates

9/8/15 – 12/18/15


Instructors


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

RSSP-8410


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

SKSM and Institute of Buddhist Studies: Our Co-Sponsored Courses Fall 2015

During Fall 2015, the Institute of Buddhist Studies will offer the following courses. Please note ~ we participate in the same GTU registration periods. To register for an IBS course, follow the same instructions as registering for a Starr King course. See How to Register. Most, but not all, IBS courses do not require a PIN, so pay close attention when registering. View IBS Fall 2015  Course listings, including:

  • HRPH-8455 Topics in Japanese Buddhist Thought: Women, Family, Dharma
  • HRHS-8307 Premodern Shin Buddhist History

Again, the Institute of Buddhist Studies and Starr King School have different requirements for registration. For example, SKSM does not accept auditors. Although sponsored by SKSM, IBS courses follow IBS rules. Please check course descriptions carefully before registering.


Session

Fall 2015


Dates

9/8/15 – 12/18/15


Instructors

TBD


Course Type

Online


Location

No Location


Faculty Approval Required

TBD

Sustainability and Resilience Practices for Spiritual Leaders

How do those called to bless the world – to engage with the suffering and healing of others, and of the planet – ground and sustain themselves? Students will link theory, practice, and personal experience to develop their personal theologies for sustainable, resilient leadership – and learn practical tools to serve their vocations “for the long haul”. Together, we will explore concepts including compassion fatigue, measuring emotional and spiritual health, vocational burnout, trauma stewardship, boundary setting, and care for self and community. Participants will also explore how to positively influence organizational culture and build healthy, sustainable congregations and other organizations. This interactive, multi-faceted course combines multimedia, readings, class discussion, a praxis (action/reflection) component, and more, and is open to all interested in spiritual leadership for social change.


Session

Fall 2015


Dates

9/8/15 – 12/18/15


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

RSFT-8416


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

Spring 2016

Aging Issues & Ministry

This course can be taken alone, but it is also the second half of a winter semester intensive course. It is suitable for students interested in chaplaincy, pastoral and congregational ministry, as well as for students interested in broader sociological perspectives. We will share our attention between focused pastoral and broader societal aspects of aging. Our culture encourages us to understand aging-related issues only as a person’s individual problems and ignore systems of privilege and difference. These misapprehensions lessen our ability to be effective in our ministries.

We will touch on ageism/stereotypes; changing roles; spiritual development; loss of independence; paid/unpaid caregivers; dementias; congregational programs; death/dying, both individually and in the broader societal context in which these individual situations and problems are situated. You will be offered a wide variety of readings and resources to use in your own work. This course can be taken as a follow-up to Aging Issues and Ministry, Jan. 2016


Session

Spring 2015


Dates

2/1/16 – 5/20/16


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

CEPS-8400


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

1.5


Download

Foundations of Religious Freedom in the U.S.

A blended learning course on the origins and development of religious liberty in the US from the colonial and founding periods to the mid-twentieth century. It offers a thorough understanding of the historical and legal foundations that currently govern the relationship of religion and government, define protection for the free exercise of religion, and provide the civic framework for living among people of all religions and none. Part of a pilot program for the Certificate in Religion in Public Life in cooperation with the Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum: http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/admissions/areas-of-study/religious-leaders . Online from February 8 to May 18, 2016 plus three day immersion course at the RFC in Washington D.C. (March 21-23). Travel expenses are the responsibility of the students. Designed and administered Rev. by Nate Walker, RFC Executive Director, supervised by Dean Lettini. (http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/contact/directory/?entry=18)


Session

Spring 2016


Dates

2/8/16 – 5/18/16


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

HSRS-8210


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3

Global Religious Traditions

This course will examine the major global religions from a cross-cultural, multi-religious perspective.  Taking into consideration that a course that explores many religions cannot be comprehensive, we will consider the religions from a thematic perspective by analyzing fundamental beliefs and practices in the various religious traditions.  In addition, we will also examine assumptions underlying the discipline of religious studies.  Students will engage through weekly readings and forum discussion, as well as other interactive learning activities, as part of the online learning community.  Students of all faiths and backgrounds are invited and encouraged to enroll.  Priority given to off-campus SKSM students.


Session

Spring 2016


Dates

2/1/16 – 5/20/16


Instructors


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

HR-8401


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

Introduction to Liberal Religious Education

This online seminar course provides a broad introduction to the theory and practice of liberal religious education, with an emphasis on Unitarian Universalist congregations. Topics include history and philosophy of Unitarian Universalist religious education, teaching and learning, developmental theories, the congregation as an educating community, social justice visions for religious education, current approaches and innovations in religious education for all ages, collegial relationships and professional standards for religious educators, and curriculum resources. The course draws from another by the same name, developed by Betty Jo Middleton, Roberta M. Nelson, Eugene B. Navias, and Judith Mannheim, with support from a St. Lawrence Foundation grant. Open to seminarians, ministers, religious educators, and other lay leaders.

 


Session

Spring 2016


Dates

2/1/16 – 5/20/16


Instructors


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

ED-8465


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

Organizational Management

Merging the practical and pastoral, this foundational course helps equip students for effective organizational management and leadership – whether serving congregations, leading other religious institutions, or bringing spiritual leadership to secular settings. Topics of exploration include non-profit administration, governance, finance, strategic planning, human resources, change management, and organizational culture – and how these relate to ministry. This interactive, multi-faceted course blends readings and written assignments with group discussion, coaching, independent research, and a praxis (action/reflection) component. With the support of the instructor, students will customize their course experience to build on their unique learning goals, aptitudes, and areas for improvement as organizational leaders.


Session

Spring 2016


Dates

2/1/16 – 5/20/16


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

RSFT-8411


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

Queering Ecclesiology and Rites

Across Asia and Latin America we are witnessing the emergence of queer faith-based communities in very dissimilar contexts and with very different histories. Exploring the way that these communities address issues of ecclesiology and rites would benefit students to explore the ways that our global village is moving in terms of the intersections among religion, gender, and sexuality. The course investigates what are the struggles and mechanisms that these communities have to cope in their context with ingrained homophobia, transphobia, lesbophobia and the like. At the same time, it will examine how those communities enact interreligious and multireligious dialogue and rituals and how faith and activism are coupled to counter oppressive discourses and colonial performativities in their own situations. The course also features guest ministers and activists from different context to whom we can turn to learn from their experiences and who will be “present” every class through recorded videos.


Session

Spring 2016


Dates

2/1/16 – 5/20/16


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

RSHR-8450


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

SKSM and Institute of Buddhist Studies: Our Co-Sponsored Courses Spring 2016

During Spring 2016, the Institute of Buddhist Studies will offer the following courses. Please note ~ we participate in the same GTU registration periods. To register for an IBS course, follow the same instructions as registering for a Starr King course. See How to Register. Most, but not all, IBS courses do not require a PIN, so pay close attention when registering. View IBS Spring 2016 Course Listings, including:

  • HRPH-8488: Topics in Zen Buddhist Thought with Professor Taigen Dan Leighton
  • HRHS-8455: Topics in Buddhist Thought with Professor Lisa Grumbach
  • HR-8250: Esoteric Buddhism with Professor Richard Payne

Again, the Institute of Buddhist Studies and Starr King School have different requirements for registration. For example, SKSM does not accept auditors. Although sponsored by SKSM, IBS courses follow IBS rules. Please check course descriptions carefully before registering.


Session

Spring 2016


Dates

2/1/16 – 5/20/16


Instructors

TBD


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


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Spiritual Practices for These Times

In this semester-long, online class, students will explore, develop, and deepen their spiritual practice and encourage classmates to do the same.  The class will be experiential and multi-faith, drawing on some of the wisdom and practices of Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Buddhism, as well as neuroscience, poetry, nature, movement, and the arts.  Specific attention will be paid to practices involving mindfulness, sabbath-keeping, gratitude, prayer, compassion, loving kindness, equanimity and joy.


Session

Spring 2016


Dates

2/1/16 – 5/20/16


Instructors


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

SPFT-8400


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


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U.S. Religious Liberty Today

A blended course on the evolution of the First Amendment religious Freedom principles from the 1940s, through the civil rights era, to today. Participants will address contemporary issues that concern the constitutional relationship of religion and government along with current debates over the meaning of free exercise of religion. Part of a pilot program for the Certificate in Religion in Public Life offered in cooperation with the Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum, http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/admissions/areas-of-study/religious-leaders . The course will be taught online from February 8 to May 18, 2016. Participants will need to attend a three day immersion course at the Religious Freedom Center in Washington D.C. on March 21-23 2016. Travel expenses are the responsibility of the students.  Designed and administered Lauren W. Herman (JD, MTS) of the RFC of the Newseum, supervised by Dean Lettini. (http://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/contact/directory/?entry=23 )


Session

Spring 2016


Dates

2/8/16 – 5/18/16


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

HSRS-8211


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3

Unitarian Universalist History

This course begins with an examination of the (alleged) antecedents to Unitarianism and Universalism in pre-Reformation Europe. We begin with development of Unitarianism in Poland, Transylvania, and England, then on to that of North American Unitarianism through its classical age, the Transcendentalist development, and the various crises of identity and purpose that develop into and through the late 19th and 20th centuries. Then we turn our attention to Universalist ascendency, decline, and then consolidation with Unitarianism. Careful attention will be paid throughout to the Unitarian/Universalist social location in relationship to class, race, and gender identities, and how these sometimes enabled and sometimes impaired social justice advances.

 


Session

Spring 2016


Dates

2/1/16 – 5/20/16


Course Type

Online


Location

Online


Course ID

HSFT-8462


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


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