Intersession 2016

Course Descriptions

Field Education

Clinical Pastoral Education

This course is for Starr King students engaged in part-time or full-time Clinical Pastoral Education.  Participate in ministry to persons, and in individual group reflection upon that ministry. Theoretical material from theology, the behavioral sciences, and pastoral care.  Integrates theological understanding and knowledge of behavioral science into pastoral functioning.  Upon completion, a written evaluation from the program supervisor will be placed into the student’s permanent files.  Discuss first with your advisor and then faculty. Final evaluation from CPE supervisor needs to be sent to faculty by the last day of the semester to receive credit. Every year SKSM offers an orientation to CPE and to the application process; students are responsible for applying and securing a place in a CPE program. Please check the SKSM Student Handbook for more information.


Session

January Intersession 2016


Course Type

Field Education


Location

Off-site


Course ID

FE-4012


Faculty Approval Required

No


Units

1-4

Community Field Work

Field work describes an involvement in community work for up to 15 hours a week with the ongoing support of a mentor. Community Field Work includes work in gender, racial and economic justice, queer activism, disability advocacy, immigration issues, environmental responsibility, civil liberties protection, HIV response, youth at risk, peace building, participating in a fundraising campaign for a non for profit or grassroots organization, chaplaincy, teaching and more. Students should discuss the field work opportunity with their advisor before making arrangements with the professor.  Student and community mentor should discuss and sign a learning agreement before the official beginning of the field work experience. Midterm and final student/mentor evaluations will also be required by midterm and the last day of SKSM classes. All forms available from the professor at the beginning of the semester and on the SKSM Website.  Please see Student Handbook for more information.


Session

January Intersession 2016


Course Type

Field Education


Location

Off-site


Course ID

FE-4061


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

0.5-2

Congregational Field Work – Jan.

Fieldwork in Unitarian Universalist congregations may include teaching a religious education class for children or adults, working with a youth group, participating in a stewardship campaign and/or more. Please arrange with the professor.


Session

January Intersession 2016


Instructors


Course Type

Field Education


Location

Off-site


Course ID

FE-4051


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

1-3

Immersion

No courses found

Intensive

Advanced Thematic Preaching

This is an advanced intensive in thematic preaching intended for students with preaching experience who seek to further develop their own unique preaching presence and voice. Topics will focus on thematic development, use of poetic voice, effective sermon construction, pulpit presence, and preaching through the liturgical year. This course utilizes a high level of peer collaboration and review. All religious traditions welcome. Advanced preparation of sermons and some advanced reading will be required. Prerequisites: an introductory level homiletics course or extensive preaching experience with permission of the instructor.


Session

January Intersession 2016


Dates

1/19/16 – 1/23/16


Instructors


Course Type

Intensive


Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)


Room

Round Chapel


Time

9:00am-5:00pm


Course ID

HM-4007


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


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Aging Issues and Ministry

This course is offered in two halves, each of which can be taken on its own. This half of the course will use popular cultural media – primarily film but also popular printed materials to draw attention to important current aging-related issues. “Getting old” is associated with many “loss” stereotypes: diminished power, physical attractiveness, independence, productivity – we will use popular cultural media to examine these stereotypes in the context of our cultural paradigms that encourage us to understand aging-related issues only as a person’s individual problems and ignore systems of privilege and difference.

The culturally imposed messages that we absorb implicitly and explicitly from popular media lessen our ability to be effective in our ministries. Bringing them into our awareness helps us counter age-related oppressive belief systems. There will be some reading required beforehand. We will spend our time together reflecting on rhetoric in popular magazines, newspapers, films.


Session

January Intersession 2016


Dates

1/19/16 – 1/22/16


Course Type

Intensive


Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)


Room

Reading Room


Time

9:00am-1:00pm


Course ID

CEPS-4000


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

1.5


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CANCELED: Multi-Religious Core Intensive: The Cave of the Heart

This one-week course will examine the life and writings of Swami Abhishiktananda (aka Dom Henri LeSaux, OSB), a Breton Benedictine monk who lived in India as a monastic embracing Western Roman Catholic monastic tradition, as well as those of the dharmic traditions of South Asia. Students are invited to visit the website of the Abhishiktananda Centre for Interreligious Dialogue http://www.abhishiktananda.org.in/#!/page_portfolio.  The course will consist of daily readings, films and discussions of the writings of Swami Abhishiktananda, as well as spiritual practices accompanying the theoria. What does he bring to the study of organic multireligiosity and multiple religious belongings? This course qualifies as the Multi-religious Core Intensive, required for students in the M.Div. program.

 


Session

January Intersession 2016


Dates

1/25/16 – 1/29/16


Course Type

Intensive


Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)


Room

Mudd 103


Time

9:00am-5:00pm


Course ID

HR-4207


Faculty Approval Required

No


Units

3


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CANCELED: Strategies for Social Change

This course is open to all interested in social change – whether as a community organizer, congregational leader, activist, scholar, non-profit leader, educator, or in other role/s. We will contrast a diversity of tactics used to assess organizational and community needs, mobilize religious and secular leaders, and build effective partnerships for justice. Central to this exploration is the idea that struggles for justice are interconnected, calling us to build new and diverse partnerships, and expanding analysis of how to make change. Together, participants will bring to life theologies for “collective liberation” – building a world that embodies the inherent worth and dignity of all beings. This interactive course requires reading in advance, and utilizes case studies of social change efforts which employ an intersectional approach: linking class, race, religion, gender, sexuality, dis/ability, ecological, and other issues and identities.


Session

January Intersession 2016


Dates

1/19/16 – 1/22/16


Course Type

Intensive


Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)


Room

Reading Room


Time

1:30pm-5:30pm


Course ID

RSFT-4015


Faculty Approval Required

No


Units

1.5


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CANCELED: Working Through Work Issues

We begin addressing the myth of the American Dream, and then step out of that framework to consider the US work experience through the lenses of race, ethnicity, gender identity, abilities, income, and class.

As issues affecting the US workplace also influence our congregations and ministerial constituencies, so we will delve into corporatist systems issues including layoffs, bullying, wage theft and discrimination.

Growing income inequality is likewise a concern to our ministries and we will consider the history of income inequality in the United States and compare and contrast that history with the current reality.

In this class we will also take a close look at the 2008 mortgage crisis with special attention to those most affected by it. There will be prerequisite readings which will be included in the final syllabus. This class is taught by a Hilda Mason Fellowship Recipient.


Session

January Intersession 2016


Dates

1/4/16 – 1/8/16


Instructors


Course Type

Intensive


Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)


Room

Reading Room


Time

9:00am-5:00pm


Course ID

RSHS-4084


Faculty Approval Required

No


Units

3


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Health Ethics

Health and medicine lie at the intersection of thea/ologies, morals, and our bodies. This course provides a foundation in bioethics and the complexities of health, illness and health care. Students develop the ability to apply ethical theory and biopolitical knowledge to public health and clinical issues. Topics include: end-of-life decision-making, the care of vulnerable populations, genetic/reproductive technologies, and organ donation. The course includes a laboratory component; in which students lead analysis of key concepts and ethical problems in order to produce valuable arguments for bioethical debate as well as pastoral leadership. This course has four components: (1) pre-reading and assessment; (2) a collaborative story-catching project; (3) week-long January intensive; and (4) a final research paper, or case analysis on three bioethics topics due early February.


Session

January Intersession 2016


Dates

1/25/16 – 1/29/16


Instructors


Course Type

Intensive


Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)


Room

Chapel


Time

9:00am-5:00pm


Course ID

CE-4703


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


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Leadership, Liturgy and Learning: Embodied Ritual

A week-long immersion to explore the design, experience and leadership of multigenerational worship and ritual. Readings and activities will emphasize the role of liturgist as leader of faith formation in religious community. Texts, field trips, video and story will be drawn from the work of artists, performers, clergy and thinkers who guide our study and creation of transformational ritual and liturgical forms. There will be dancing, there will be poems, there will be food, there will be song, there will be art-making and picture taking.  Course details will be sent in advance and will include reading, worship preparation and one writing assignment.  Final project will be due in February.  Please note that there will be evening sessions and local field trips built into the class schedule.


Session

January Intersession 2016


Dates

1/10/16 – 1/15/16


Course Type

Intensive


Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)


Room

Fireside Room


Time

9:00am-5:00pm


Course ID

RALS-4300


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


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Quran: Feminist Readings

In this course we will examine the worldview, language, narratives and teachings of the Quran to begin to understand the implications of the Quranic texts on the lives of women, on gender construction and gender relations.  In the process we shall examine feminist writings on the Quran or on issues pertaining to Muslim women that relate to Quran. The course will involve an extensive and intensive critical engagement with the texts.  The insights of historical-critical method, form criticism, modernist interpretations and sufi praxis will inform our deliberations. As an intensive course, students will be expected to come to class having done the required readings and with the first draft of the course requirements.  The students will have a few weeks after the course to revise their assignments for submission.  It is imperative that students do the preparatory work or they will not be able to participate as fully in class and they will also have difficulty completing the course requirements after the course.


Session

January Intersession 2016


Dates

1/11/16 – 1/15/16


Instructors


Course Type

Intensive


Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)


Room

Reading Room


Time

9:00am-5:00pm


Course ID

HRBS-4820


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


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Unitarian Univeralist History

This course begins with an examination of the (alleged) antecedents to Unitarianism and Universalism in pre-Reformation Europe. We begin with development of Unitarianism in Poland, Transylvania, and England, then on to that of North American Unitarianism through its classical age, the Transcendentalist development, and the various crises of identity and purpose that develop into and through the late 19th and 20th centuries. Then we turn our attention to Universalist ascendency, decline, and then consolidation with Unitarianism. Careful attention will be paid throughout to the Unitarian/Universalist social location in relationship to class, race, and gender identities, and how these sometimes enabled and sometimes impaired social justice advances.


Session

January Intersession 2016


Dates

1/4/16 – 1/8/16


Course Type

Intensive


Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)


Room

Fireside Room


Time

9:00am-5:00pm


Course ID

HSFT-4462


Faculty Approval Required

Yes


Units

3


Download

Online

No courses found

Residential

No courses found

Residential Hybrid

No courses found

Thesis/Final Project

No courses found