Spring 2011

2010 - 2011 Courses - Spring Semester

  • Spring Semester 2011 Early Registration: Nov. 8-19, 2010
  • Spring Semester 2011 General Registration: Jan. 17–28, 2011

Early Registration is strongly advised, as many classes do fill early.

Starr King Tuition and Course Fees.

Students enrolled in a degree program at Starr King School (or any other Graduate Theological Union school) should follow the registration processes outlined by their school’s registrar.  Starr King’s processes are listed in the Starr King Student Handbook (password required to view).

To register for a course if you are not in a degree program at Starr King or the GTU, please see "How to Register for a Starr King Course".

 
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Spring 2011 Online and Residential Courses

(Note: the online courses listed on this page are also listed in the online education section of the website: online.sksm.edu)

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

Online Courses Spring 2011 

Global Religious Traditions ~NEW!!
Carmen Lansdowne

Online
This course will examine the main global religions from a thematic perspective. Acknowledging that a course that covers many religions cannot be comprehensive, we will also look at the assumptions underlying religious studies as a discipline. Students will engage in individual readings, online forums, experiential learning and theological reflection together as an online community. At the end of the course, students should be able to examine the gifts and challenges posed by religious traditions in a globalizing world, as well as undertake power analysis to deepen analysis of faith traditions and address justice issues. Students of all faiths will be invited to participate. Registration PIN required - priority given to off-campus students.
View the course syllabus.
HR-8401    3 units
Minimum 5           Limit: 20
Course syllabus and book-list coming soon.
Next Registration Period: Jan 17-28, 2011


Systems Thinking for Religious Leaders
Helen Bishop
Online

This course is designed to promote understanding among religious leaders of how organizations operate on the systems level. “Systems thinking” is a methodology linking understandings of how individuals, small and large groups of people interact with the structure, policies, practices, and culture of an organization. Participants will read materials on various aspects of organizational life, examine the ways in which components interact, discuss emotional and family systems theories and their implications for congregational systems, use systems analysis and thinking to investigate congregational leadership, analyze case studies for evidence of organizational frames, and prepare a case study demonstrating systems thinking. References and examples of working to counter oppressions are foundational to this course. / Dr. Helen Bishop holds an Ed.D in organizational leadership and has an extensive background working with Unitarian Universalist congregations, districts and affiliated organizations. She has designed, developed and taught online courses related to all aspects of lay leadership and congregational studies, including a pilot project for Unitarian Universalist lay leaders. She also served as director of The Mountain Learning Center for Leadership in Highlands, N.C., and as District Executive for Congregational Services for the UUA’s Central Midwest District. She received the Angus MacLean Award for Service to Religious Education in October, 2008.
FT-8404           3 Units
Minimum 8       Limit 21            Pin Required: Yes
Click for Syllabus
Next Registration Period: Jan 17-28, 2011
           

Our Theological House: An Introduction to Theology for UUs
Darcy Baxter
Online

Traversing the classical topics of systematic theology (the nature of God, humanity, Christ, Spirit, sin and salvation, and the purpose of the church), this online course will introduce Unitarian Universalists and interested fellow travelers to the distinctive theological perspectives that give our theological house its shape and character. The course will include readings in the history of theology and contemporary sources, combined with online discussions and reflection papers. The goal is to deepen Unitarian Universalist theological competency and creativity in our emerging post-modern context. / Currently serving as the Intern Minister at the UU Church of Berkeley, Darcy Baxter holds an M.Div from Starr King School for the Ministry and a B.A. from Smith College. Reproductive justice has been the soil of her thea/ological work, starting from the human suffering that is revealed and addressed (or not addressed) through abortion provision. She draws heavily on Process, Feminist, Womanist, Queer, and Post-Colonial thea/ologies and identifies as a UU-Queer-Feminist-Process-Thea/ologian who grew up in a Unitarian Universalist “Society” in the Jewish part of town. She also loves to dance.
ST-8402           3 Units
Minimum 8       Limit 15            Pin Required: Yes
View the course syllabus (pdf)
Next Registration Period: Jan 17-28, 2011
           

Spiritual Practice for These Times
Chris Fry
Online

This is not a time to live without a practice. . . . Whether we reach this inner state of recognized divinity through prayer, meditation, dancing, swimming, walking, feeding the hungry or enriching the impoverished is immaterial. We will be doubly bereft without some form of practice that connects us, in a caring way, to what begins to feel like a dissolving world. ~Alice Walker  This year-long, online course will support students in developing or strengthening their spiritual practice in order to meet the challenges of life and ministry in these times. The class will be experiential and multi-religious, drawing on the wisdom and practices of Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Buddhism, as well as science and deep ecology. Fall semester will focus inward on meditation, gratitude and sabbath-keeping. Spring semester will focus outward on compassion, kindness and service. Taken together, these ancient, intersecting practices will assist students in finding a rhythm of being and doing ~ in their personal lives and their ministries ~ that is healthy, joyful and sustainable. It is expected that students will take both semesters. / The Rev. Chris Fry is a grateful graduate of Starr King School for the Ministry (‘96). An Adjunct Faculty member for more than five years, Chris has taught courses on poetry, illness and pastoral care; forgiveness; compassion and moral repair; and religious education. She offers “Write for Health” groups and spiritual direction, coordinates her church’s small group ministry, and is active in an interfaith shelter program in her hometown of Davis, CA. Her daughter, Esumi, was born during Chris’ second year at SKSM and is now a high school junior. Her husband, Isao Fujimoto, is a community organizer and professor at UC Davis.
SPFT-8400       1.5 Units
Minimum 5       Limit 16            Pin Required: Yes
Click for Syllabus
Next Registration Period: Jan 17-28, 2011
           

Aging and Religious Leadership
Devorah Greenstein
Online

This online course will explore the complexities of growing old in our contemporary United States. Course readings and discussion will include topics from the personal to the societal: from individual pastoral issues, to community involvement, to institutional and societal oppression. Using an analytic framework of ageism and its manifestations, we will study aging and: spiritual development; congregational support structures; pastoral relationships with caregivers and elders who have disabilities including dementias; implications of role changes (e.g., role loss associated with retirement); movement from independence to dependence/interdependence; gerotranscendence. We will seek strategies we can use to help elders successfully navigate these age-related changes. / The Rev. Dr. Devorah Greenstein is recently retired from eight years as the Unitarian Universalist Association as the Program Coordinator in the Office of Accessibility Concerns in the Identity-based Ministries staff group. Since her retirement she has been a visiting research fellow at Yale Divinity School and she continues her institutional calling as the Chair of the National Council of Churches in Christ Committee on Disabilities. Her work includes educating and developing resources for religious professionals, lay leaders, and other individuals and groups who are engaged in anti-racist, anti-oppressive, multicultural transformation work to confront institutional and cultural ageism, ableism, racism, classism, and heterosexism. Her educational training, which includes an M.Div. from Starr King School for the Ministry; M.S. degree from Cornell University in Family Studies; Ph.D. from Cornell University in Developmental Psychology; and a M.S. degree from Syracuse University in Counseling, has given her a contextual theoretical perspective in which she grounds her anti-oppression work. Her work has always been along side of, and on behalf of, people from historically marginalized communities ~ at different times working at different times working with elder communities, farm-worker families, people living with mental illness, and physical disabilities.
SPFT-8430       3 Units
Minimum 8       Limit 15            Pin Required: Yes
Click for Syllabus
Next Registration Period: Jan 17-28, 2011
           

Congregational Polity
Mark Harris
Online

This is a course in the history and development of Congregational Polity in the Unitarian Universalist tradition. How did Congregational Polity evolve and what were the differences in the Unitarian and Universalist approaches to governance? How have we handled issues of centralized authority and bureaucracy? We’ll look at how religious communities make decisions, support their leaders and define ministry. With ministry we will ask about power, gender and ethics, the call, and the meaning and context for worship and rites of passage. /The Rev. Mark Harris is a 1978 graduate of Starr King. He has served churches in London and Sheffield, England, and in Palmer, Milton, and currently Watertown, MA. He also teaches at Andover Newton Theological School. He is a former Director of Information for the UUA, and is the author of the Historical Dictionary of Unitarian Universalism (The A to Z of Unitarian Universalism in paperback) and Elite: Uncovering Classism in Unitarian Universalism.
FT-8420           3 Units
Minimum 5       Limit 15            Pin Required: Yes
Click for Syllabus
Next Registration Period: Jan 17-28, 2011
           

Universalism: History, Theology, and Practice
Jeff Wilson
Online

In many congregations, Universalism seems to be the unknown half of UU denominational heritage. This course will help contemporary Unitarian-Universalists better understand the history of their Universalist ancestors and discern how Universalism lives on within and beyond the combined denomination. We will discuss early Christian Universalism, Universalist ideas among the Unitarians, the creation and history of the Universalist Church of America, Universalist themes within other major religions, and much more. The focus will be on historical development, theological issues, and shared praxis. Students will read widely from important primary sources, as well as being introduced to major secondary resources. / Dr. Jeff Wilson is an assistant professor of Religious Studies and East Asian Studies at Renison University College, University of Waterloo, in Ontario. Raised in one of the last surviving large, historically-Universalist churches in New England, Dr. Wilson’s specialties include liberal religious history and practice, with particular attention to the role of Universalism. In addition to teaching the course on Universalism, he has contributed to the SKSM online courses World Religions and Our Theological House.
HSST-8424      3 Units
Minimum 5       Limit 20            Pin Required: Yes
View or print course syllabus (pdf).
Next Registration Period: Jan 17-28, 2011


Mental Illness and Oppression in the U.S.
Devorah Greenstein
Online

This is an anti-oppression course. We will gain an understanding of the DSM-IV-TR (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th edition) as the hegemonic framework of “mental disorders.” We will use race/ethnicity; class; age; gender; institutional power as the anti-oppression framework to examine cultural definitions and treatments of people who live with “mental disorders.” We will take specific issues (e.g. therapies; treatments; pharmaceuticals; criminal justice; mental health policies; children; youth; returning soldiers) to examine the frameworks’ intersections. Students will complete the course with an understanding of contemporary systemic and individual meanings of mental illness and our institutional systems. / The Rev. Dr. Devorah Greenstein is recently retired from eight years as the Unitarian Universalist Association as the Program Coordinator in the Office of Accessibility Concerns in the Identity-based Ministries staff group. Since her retirement she has been a visiting research fellow at Yale Divinity School and she continues her institutional calling as the Chair of the National Council of Churches in Christ Committee on Disabilities. Her work includes educating and developing resources for religious professionals, lay leaders, and other individuals and groups who are engaged in anti-racist, anti-oppressive, multicultural transformation work to confront institutional and cultural ageism, ableism, racism, classism, and heterosexism. Her educational training, which includes an M.Div. from Starr King School for the Ministry; M.S. degree from Cornell University in Family Studies; Ph.D. from Cornell University in Developmental Psychology; and a M.S. degree from Syracuse University in Counseling, has given her a contextual theoretical perspective in which she grounds her anti-oppression work. Her work has always been along side of, and on behalf of, people from historically marginalized communities ~ at different times working at different times working with elder communities, farm-worker families, people living with mental illness, and physical disabilities.
CEPS-8500   3 Units
Minimum 5     Limit 18   Pin Required: Yes
Click for Syllabus
Next Registration Period: Jan 17-28, 2011

Survey of Zen Buddhism
Taigen Leighton

Online
This course will survey the historical and philosophical development and practices of Zen, as it is called in Japan, or Ch’an in Chinese, Son in Korean. We will read and discuss writings from dynamic major figures in the tradition from China, Korea, and Japan, such as Bodhidharma, Hui-neng, Pai-chang, Chao-chou, Tung-shan, and Yun-men in China, Chinul in Korea, and Dogen, Ikkyu, Hakuin, and Ryokan in Japan. We will examine the religious import of their colorful teaching stories, as well as how these stories were used in Zen practice. Related to these figures we well explore major themes such as monastic set-ups, societal influences, and ritual enactments. We will explore major practices including strategies for meditation, with instruction in experiential engagement in some of these practices. We will also look at the historical and cultural impact of Ch’an /Zen, including the development of the Way of Tea and its associated arts and Samurai Zen in Japan. We will conclude with some consideration of modern developments and Zen's popular importation to the West. Course format: Online Lecture. Evaluation method: Participation/Term paper. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute for Buddhist Studies.
HR-8150          3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: Jan 17-28, 2011           

Buddhist Traditions of East Asia
Lisa Grumbach

Online
Introduces the Buddhist traditions as they originated in India and develop through south and southeast Asia. Second half of the required year long introductory survey of the entire Buddhist tradition. Course format: Online Lecture. Evaluation method: Participation/Term paper. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute for Buddhist Studies.
HRHS-8152     3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: Jan 17-28, 2011           

Psychological Aspects Buddhism I
Gordon Bermant

Online
An examination of the development of psychological theories in the abhidharma, Yogacara and tathagatagarbha systems of thought, particularly through the reading of primary sources in translation. May be repeated for credit when different primary texts are being studied. Course format: Online discussion. Evaluation method: Participation/term paper. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute for Buddhist Studies.
HRPS-8320    3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: Jan 17-28, 2011           

Topics in Buddhist Thought: Japanese Buddhism Through Personal Perspectives
Online
Lisa Grumbach

This course introduces Buddhism in Japan not by looking at the great sweeps of history but by focusing on the personal writings (in translation) of a limited number of figures in various time periods. Through these personal perspectives, the major aspects of Buddhism will be explored, from the advent of Buddhism to Japan, through the great changes in doctrine and practice of the medieval period, and the profound transformation of Japanese Buddhism in the Meiji period. Figures include, among others, the “Father of Japanese Buddhism” Prince Shotoku, the great founders Kukai and Saicho, the medieval monk Myoe, the courtesan Lady Nijo, the chronicler Muju Ichien, and the Meiji-era reformer Kiyozawa Manshi. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute for Buddhist Studies.
HRPH-8455    3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: Jan 17-28, 2011

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 


Residential Courses

Monday 

Tracing the Arc of the Universe:  Oppression, Change and Resistance in Unitarian Universalism
* CANCELED *

Mondays, 2:10pm - 5:00pm
Leslie Takahashi Morris
This course will be a journey into the history of oppression in our liberal religious faith, using race as a key lens.  As religious liberals, we have often been among the first to begin to extend rights to groups which have been historically disenfranchised, disempowered or oppressed.  And yet, we have also faced serious set-backs when our own perceptions of our place in the religious spectrum have kept us from undertaking the real change needed to transform culture, hearts and institutions.   Through selective study of the journeys of women, people of color/Latina/o/Hispanic peoples, those with marginalized sexual orientations or gender identities, and disabled persons, participants will reflect on the nature of social change and develop tools for effective advocacy.
View or download the course syllabus (pdf).
HS 4037   3 Units
Minimum 6     Limit 18  Pin Required: No
Fireside Room
* CANCELED *

 

How People Pray
Mondays, 7:10pm - 9:40pm
Jodi Tharan & Perry Pike
Prayer has an impact on people’s actions across time and place. People have and do pray in many and varied ways. This course addresses the question “What does prayer mean?” as a tool in the work of countering oppressions. How People Pray takes prayer and praying seriously as a skill that contributes to transformative religious leadership. Prayer will be considered from a variety of faith perspectives while also exploring the art and practice of prayer as individuals within particular communities. While learning about prayer, participants will also experience prayer as an embodied social justice practice. This is an experiential and participatory course. Foundational study of texts from Jewish, Islamic, Buddhist and Christian prayer supports the learning. Prayer in other faith traditions will also be encountered. The course structure is grounded in the notion that participants learn in community emphasizing respectful interreligious dialogue. This course is being co-taught by a Starr King Teaching Fellow.
View the course syllabus (pdf).
FTLS 4239 3 Units
Minimum 6     Limit 18  Pin Required: Yes
Fireside Room

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 

Tuesday 

Spirituality and Nonviolent Social Transformation:
Gandhi, King, Day, and Chavez

Tuesdays, 2:10pm - 5:00pm
Dorsey Blake
This course will explore the quests for justice through nonviolence of Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., Dorothy Day and César Chávez.  Critical to the course will be an emphasis on the connection between spirituality and social action.  What were the influences, e.g., Emerson, Thoreau, Tolstoy, DuBois, that helped shape the zeitgeist of their times?  How were strategies determined and employed?  What is essential to an effective nonviolent campaign?  What were the faith foundations of these extraordinary leaders?  What were their relationships to their communities?  How did they manage to keep their resolve in times of disappointments?  These are some of the questions the course will explore.
View the course syllabus.
SPRS 4024 3 Units
Minimum: 1  Limit: 32  Pin Required: Yes
Fireside Room

Sacred & the Substance
Tuesdays, 7:10pm - 9:40pm
Ayize Jama-Everett
Taught not from a place of oppression or celebration, this course seeks to interrogate the history and current day uses of “drugs”.  Questioning not only the overarching category, this course will also examine how those who utilize drugs in their lives on a regular basis, from shamans to chaotic using addicts, are impacted psychologically, physically, and spiritually.  The quality and nature of drugs will also be examined in light of their prescribed benefits and risks.  We will be interrogating the history of Drug Laws in the United States from the Harrison Act to the current war on drugs, looking at the responses of drug utilizing communities, from A.A. to Harm reduction.  Through it all, we will be searching for the ways in which spirituality, religion, and faith are utilized by both sides.
View the course syllabus online.
RSPS 4291 3 Units
Minimum 1     Limit 20  Pin Required: No
Fireside Room

Kabbalah as Sacred Psychology
Tuesdays, 7:10 - 9:40pm
Estelle Frankel
This class will introduce students to the healing wisdom and spiritual practices of the Kabbalah and show how its myths and symbols serve as therapeutic paradigms for growth, healing, and transformation.  Through sacred text study, storytelling, guided meditation, chant, and ritual we will journey into the paradoxical heart of mystical Judaism--a realm in which light emanates from darkness, perfection is reached through imperfection, and wholeness is achieved by integrating the contradictory and often fragmented aspects of our being.  We will also study teachings from the kabbalistic-musar tradition focused on tikkun ha’middot—the cultivation of virtue by perfecting the soul’s divine attributes.  This foundational inner work, shared by both Jewish mystics and Musar masters alike, helps ground our spiritual aspirations by deepening our sense of personal integrity and authenticity.  Readings for the course will be drawn from:  Sacred Therapy:  Jewish Spiritual Teachings on Emotional Healing & Inner Wholeness by Estelle Frankel, and Everyday Holiness by Alan Morinis. The instructor will also provide supplemental study packets on each of the virtues we study. Students will select one virtue to focus on and write a personal essay.
View the course syllabus (pdf).
PS 4430  3 Units
Minimum 8  Limit 40  Pin Required: Yes
Reading Room

View an introductory video to the course Kabbalah as Sacred Psychology by the professor:

Kabbalah as Sacred Psychology - Estelle Frankel from Starr King Acad Affairs on Vimeo.

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
Wednesday 

Between Sundays: Parish Life
Wednesdays, 9:40am - 12:30pm
Michelle Favreault
This course will introduce students to the rich tapestry of Unitarian Universalist parish life and leadership. Participants will consider the joys and challenges of the day to day work that supports worship each week.  From the personal power and authority of the pastor to the governance and organizational dynamics of community life, we will explore roles and relationships in the complex system of parish ministries.  Through case studies, interviews and site visits, students will gain insight into the administrative and spiritual work that happens between Sundays.
View course syllabus (pdf).
FT 4062   3 Units
Minimum 5     Limit 20  Pin Required: Yes
Fireside Room

5 Pillars and Social Justice ~ NEW ~
Wednesdays, 2:10pm – 5:00pm
Som Pourfarzaneh
This course will examine the Five Pillars of Islam academically as well as experientially, and will draw on a variety of resources, including readings, film viewings, class discussions, and field trips.  Particular attention will be focused on the contributions of the Five Pillars, namely, the Shahada (proclamation of Oneness), Salat (ritual prayers), Zakat (almsgiving), Sawm (fasting during Ramadan), and Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca) to the process of building community in Islam and promoting social justice.
View the course syllabus (pdf).
HRRS 4814 3 Units
Minimum 5     Limit 20  Pin Required: No
Reading Room

The Jewish Liturgical Year In The Diaspora
Wednesdays, 2:10pm - 5:00pm
Susan Schulman
In this course we will study a selection of Jewish holidays to discover their history and origin, the different customs observed currently for each holiday in diverse Jewish communities, which holidays are ancient pilgrimage festivals, the ways in which the celebrations are different for men and women, and the ways in which some Jewish holiday meaning, observance, music, food etc was borrowed from other traditions and other traditions borrowed from the Jews.  Included in the study of the holiday observances will be the study of food, music, dance, story, prayer and ancient sacrifice, and attitudes toward the Divine that different communities of Jews adhere to.  We will also experience the celebration of a selection of the holidays and study how the holidays are connected to each other and to the yearly cycle.
View course syllabus (pdf).
RALS 4545 3 Units
Minimum 4     Limit 15  Pin Required: No
Fireside Room

Beyond Prisons and Punishment
Wednesdays, 7:10pm - 9:40pm
Laura Magnani & Wilson Riles
A comprehensive look at the entire criminal justice system, its history, trends, and current practices.  How do we, as people of faith, minister to victims, offenders, and family members of those caught up in the system? There is a tendency, in public discourse to address criminal justice in a vacuum, whereas in this class the context for our work will be social, racial, and economic justice. Issues about prison chaplaincy, including the ethical questions imbedded in that ministry, will be discussed. We will explore new paradigms of justice, including restorative/transformative models and examine what prophetic witness calls us to.
View course syllabus (pdf).
CERS 4472 3 Units
Minimum 6     Limit 20  Pin Required: No
Fireside Room

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
Thursday 

Preach It!
Thursdays, 9:40am - 12:30pm
Kurt Kuhwald
Theories abound about how to construct authentic sermons.  In the non-exegetical homiletic path of UUism/Liberal religion, there is another possibility.  This experiential preaching course will focus on finding your authentic style and voice.  In constructing sermons, we will encounter: Presence.  Power.  Passion.  Humility.  Humor.  The truth in one's chest and gut---the body somehow singing through thought.  Further, we will explore tapping the neural ground of connection between speaker and listener and seek sources of relevance for words that speak truth, lift hope, inspire action and offer blessing.  A preacher for 14 years, a public speaker for over 30, the instructor loves the pulpit whether in a house of worship, on the street, or in the halls of government.
View course syllabus (pdf) and required textbooks (pdf).
HM 4005   3 Units
Minimum 4     Limit 12  Pin Required: Yes
Fireside Room

Ministry with the Physically Challenged
Thursdays, 2:10pm - 5:00pm
Dexter Roderick Thomas
This seminar is designed to explore the ways the physically challenged are limited by wrong labels, negative attitudes and a worldview of normalcy.  Discussion will focus on our theologies of disabilities, the disempowering effects of marginalization and the ways in which communities of faith can partner with the physically challenged for their own empowerment.
View course syllabus (pdf).
RSFT 4291 3 Units
Minimum 5     Limit 30  Pin Required: No
Fireside Room

Ahmadou and Hajji Bektash
* CANCELED *

Online and then Thursdays, 2:10pm - 5:00pm after Reading Week
Ibrahim Farajajé
This course will examine a West African Sufi and a Central Asian Sufi, both of whom become icons of transnational cultural resistance. We will look at their impact in popular culture and the positing of complexified Muslim identities in diverse contexts. The first half of the course will take place through independent reading and on-line work; the second half will consist of classroom work.
HR 5800   3 Units
Minimum 5     Limit 25  Pin Required: No
Reading Room
* CANCELED *

Sufi Storytelling and The Art of Sermon
Thursdays, 7:10pm - 9:40pm
Yassir Chadly
For centuries Sufi teachers have used the ancient art of storytelling to inspire, motivate, and provide insights into complex spiritual concepts. Parables and stories have universal appeal, speaking to people of all ages, genders, cultures, and ethnicities. The creative use of storytelling within a sermon has the ability to enliven and enrich its message, capturing the imagination of the listener. In this course students will learn how to effectively integrate storytelling into sermon preparation and delivery. Through understanding and incorporating Sufi principles, students will be encouraged to find their own voice and particular style in crafting and delivering sermons within their individual faith traditions.
View course syllabus (pdf).
HRHM 4816 3 Units
Minimum 5     Limit 15  Pin Required: No
Fireside Room

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
Friday 

Death, Dying and Bereavement
* CANCELED *
Fridays, Feb 4, 18, March 4, 18, and April 1, from 9am to 5pm
John Linder
This course explores the psychosocial and spiritual issues encountered by the dying and their caregivers and asks: “how should we respond”.  Through lecture, group discussions, panels, media and experiential activities exploring death from psychosocial, spiritual, cultural and philosophical perspectives, participants reflect and being to formulate their individual answer as a faith leader and member of a particular faith tradition.  The primary focus is on those deaths occurring as a predictable result of disease; these offer the greatest opportunity for constructive, proactive examination of the dying process.  Course emphases are on improving dying and bereavement experiences while exploring death through the ECO lens.  Individuals are also invited to explore their own spirituality and personal understanding of mortality.  Practical interventions and critical thinking are stressed equally. Some on-line course work will also be required.  Attendance is mandatory due to the experiential content.  Instructor will consult with the class to accommodate the daily schedule to the specific daily prayer or worship observances of class participants. Course meets Fridays, Feb 4, 18, March 4, 18, and April 1 from 9am to 5pm
View course syllabus (pdf).
PS 4725   3 Units
Minimum 10    Limit 20  Pin Required: Yes
Fireside Room
* CANCELED *

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
Saturday 

No Saturday courses are scheduled at this time.

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork  

Community Fieldwork Spring
Gabriella Lettini
Community Fieldwork includes work in gender, racial and economic justice, queer activism, disability advocacy, immigration issues, environmental responsibility, civil liberties protection, HIV response, youth at risk, peace building, participating in a fundraising campaign for a non for profit or grassroots organization and more. Please arrange with the professor.
FE 4062    3 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25   Pin Required: Yes

Community Internship Spring
Gabriella Lettini
Community Internships involve supervised placements in a non-profit service agency or grassroots organization, hospice work, literacy counseling and more. Those who register for this course should also register for Community Intern Reflection Fall. Arrangements should be made with the professor.
FE 4221    1-5 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25   Pin Required: Yes

Community Intern Reflection Spring
Gabriella Lettini
All SKSM students involved in community internships will meet together for reflection on their work, as it is only through the processes of theological reflection and critical reflection on experience that field work becomes field education. This class is designed to broaden and to deepen students' analytic perspective on their field site contexts and on their roles as religious leaders and professionals. Students will be grow in their ability to think and learn in a praxis oriented way, that is, allowing situations of practice to deepen and challenge their academic knowledge about theo/alogies, and allowing their academic knowledge of theology to deepen and challenge their ministerial and activist practices. In field-based experiences the depth of students’ learning depends entirely upon how well they can implement praxis oriented learning. Arrange with Instructor. All participants will be expected to attend an intern gathering inn January, date TBA.
FE 4223    2 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25   Pin Required: No

MASC Project Spring
Gabriella Lettini
For SKSM Master of Arts in Religious Leadership for Social Change (MASC) students only.  MASC students should sign up for this class during the semesters when they are producing their final project representative of their learning during the program.  A copy of the project will be placed in a public collection at the school.
MA 5300    1-12 Units
Minimum: 1 Limit: No Limit     Pin Required: No

Congregational Fieldwork Spring
Kurt Kuhwald
Fieldwork in Unitarian Universalist congregations includes teaching a religious education class for children or adults, working with a youth group, participating in a stewardship campaign and more. Please arrange with the professor.
FE 4052    1-5 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25   Pin Required: Yes

Parish Internship Spring
Kurt Kuhwald
This is a 6-10 month full-time or part-time experience in a teaching congregation under the supervision of a Minister in final Fellowship, an intern committee, and a professor at the school.  Those who register for this course should also register for Parish Intern Reflection Spring.
FE 4211    5-10 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25   Pin Required: Yes

Parish Intern Reflection Spring
Kurt Kuhwald
All Starr King students working as interns in Unitarian Universalist congregations are expected to participate in this time of reflection on their ministerial work. All participants will be expected to attend the Starr King Intern Gathering for two days TBD in January, 2011.
FE 4213    2 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25   Pin Required: Yes

Clinical Pastoral Education
Gabriella Lettini
This is for Starr King Students engaged in part-time or full-time Clinical Pastoral Education.  Participate in ministry to persons, and in individual group reflection upon that ministry. Theoretical material from theology, the behavioral sciences, and pastoral care.  Integrates theological understanding and knowledge of behavioral science into pastoral functioning.  Upon completion, a written evaluation from the program supervisor will be placed into the student's permanent files.  Arrange with your advisor or the Director of Studies in Public Ministry.
FE 4012    1-10 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25   Pin Required: No

In Thesis
TBA
Faculty
All Masters level students in the GTU community should use this designation if they are working on their thesis.
MA 5000         1-12 units
No Limit         No PIN Required

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

2010-2011
Fall / Intersession / Spring / Summer / Online

2009-2010 (archived course listings)
Fall / Intersession / Spring / Summer / Online

Click to view the Starr King catalog in PDF format. (Note: Seminary for the Laity certificate program is no longer offered.)

 

 


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