Spring 2010

2009-2010 Courses - Spring Semester

Updated: April 24, 2009

Early Registration: November 9-20, 2009
General Registration: January 25-29, 2010

Early Registration is strongly advised.

Starr King Tuition and Course Fees.

May 2010 intensives are listed on the Summer 2010 Courses page.

Spring 2010

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

Online 

HIV/AIDS Ministry
NEW!
Spring Semester Online
Vilius Rudra Dundzila

A Unitarian Universalist perspective will be used to address the pastoral, ethical, political, religious, and spiritual challenges of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The course will include local, national, and global points of focus. It will look at HIV/AIDS-related social justice issues such as stigma, poverty, racism, homophobia, sexuality, disenfranchisement, and classism, as well as pastoral care concerns of grief, suffering, disease, and death. Students will formulate their own informed responses to HIV/AIDS and create a project for their area ministerial concern.
RSPS 8401       3 units
Minimum: 8     Limit: 15         PIN Required
NEW!

Unitarian Universalist History
NEW!!
Spring Semester Online
Emily Mace
The course begins with an examination of the (alleged) antecedents to Unitarianism and Universalism in pre-Reformation Europe. We move on to trace the theological and then institutional emergence of Unitarianism out of the Radical Reformation. The Unitarian churches in Poland, Transylvania, and England will be considered in detail with attention to issues of sameness and difference in their development and declines. Special focus will be given to the relationship of these communities to their Jewish and Islamic contemporaries. We will also look at the universalism of 18th century England, and the current state of Unitarianism in Europe. Then we cross the ocean to examine the emergence of Unitarianism from developments within Puritan Congregationalism. We explore the uniquely North American institution of Universalism as response to the same cultural setting. Next:  the major themes and developments of North American Unitarianism through its classical age, the Transcendentalist development, and the various crises of identity and purpose that develop into and through the late 19th and 20th centuries. Then we turn our attention to Universalist ascendency, decline, and then consolidation with Unitarianism (perhaps the most misunderstood aspect of Unitarian/Universalist history). Careful attention will be paid throughout to the Unitarian/Universalist social location in relationship to class, race, and gender identities, and how these sometimes enabled and sometimes impaired social justice advances.
HS 8423          3 units
Minimum: 8    Limit: 18             PIN Required 
NEW!!

Our Theological House: An Introduction to Theology for Unitarian Universalists
NEW!!
Spring Semester Online
John Buehrens
Traversing the classical topics of systematic theology (the nature of God, humanity, Christ, Spirit, sin and salvation, and the purpose of the church), this online course will introduce Unitarian Universalists and interested fellow travelers to the distinctive theological perspectives that give our theological house its shape and character. The course will include readings in the history of theology and contemporary sources, combined with online discussions and reflection papers. The goal is to deepen Unitarian Universalist theological competency and creativity in our emerging post-modern context. The Rev. Dr. Nicole C. Kirk will act as Section Instructor for this course.
ST 8402           3 units       
Minimum: 8     Limit: 24            PIN Required  
NEW!!

Promised Lands and Immigrants
Spring Semester Online                                                       
Hugo Córdova Quero
This online course will focus on the cases of Latina/o immigrants in the United States and Japan in relation to their experiences of faith, ethnicity and gender. The approach is interdisciplinary as we will draw from several fields for the analysis of the class topics. The goal of the course is to provide grounds for students to acquire tools for understanding the different realities of immigrants. Issues of faith, race/ethnicity, gender and migration will be constantly connected to pastoral reflection throughout the course, especially since our world is increasingly becoming multicultural, multiethnic and multi-religious.
RSHR 8427    3 units
Minimum: 5     Limit: 15         PIN Required

World Religions
Spring Semester Online
Tawna Nicholas Cooley, et. al.
This online World Religions course is focused on major living religions. A scholar/practitioner in each religion will teach most sections, so students will learn from the experience and expertise of several professors in this course. After an introduction to the study of world religions, we will explore Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Shinto and Sikhism, including multiplicities within traditions.  Due to wide availability of other courses, Christianity is not included.  We will discuss the lens we bring in encountering world religions.  Weekly participation in online discussions required.
HR 8400         3 units
Minimum: 8     Limit: 15         PIN Required

Congregational Polity          
Spring Semester Online
Mark Harris
This is an online course in the history and development of Congregational Polity in the Unitarian Universalist tradition. How did Congregational Polity evolve and what were the differences in the Unitarian and Universalist approaches to governance?  How have we handled issues of centralized authority and bureaucracy? We'll look at how religious communities makes decisions, support their leaders and define ministry. With ministry we will ask about power, gender and ethics, the call, and the meaning and context for worship and rites of passage.
FT 8420           3 units
Minimum: 8     Limit: 15         No PIN Required

Introduction To Liberal Religious Education
Spring Semester Online
Sheri Prud’homme
This online seminar course provides a broad introduction to the theory and practice of liberal religious education, with an emphasis on Unitarian Universalist congregations. Topics include philosophy of UU religious education, teaching and learning, developmental theories, the congregation as an educating community, social justice visions for religious education, current approaches and innovations in religious education for all ages, collegial relationships and professional standards for religious educators, and curriculum resources. The course draws on one by the same name developed by Betty Jo Middleton, Roberta M. Nelson, Eugene B. Navias, and Judith Mannheim with support from a grant by the St. Lawrence Foundation.
ED 8465          3 units            
Minimum: 8     Limit: 15         PIN Required

Unitarian Universalist Identity/Identities?
Spring Semester Online
Susan Ritchie
At numerable points in our history--one poignant example being right now--Unitarian Universalism has experienced extraordinary anxiety in relationship to its self-identity.   This course will examine the historical and institutional currents that prompt such crisis, and the resultant attempts towards coherence.  What is it that Unitarian Universalists share?  We will examine the suggested and various answers: theology, ethical principles, class location, culture, polity, history, demographics, racial identity, political alliances, covenantal community, national identity, geography, personality, statements of faith, and affirmations of common principles.  Special attention will be paid to the history of the profession of liberal ministry in this context.  Ministers have oftentimes been in conflict with the larger movement’s understanding of identity, especially as it is played out in changes to the minister’s role.  The ability to negotiate the connection between personal and collective religious identity is essential to effective ministry, and will be developed throughout this course. 
FTHS 8425     3 units            
Minimum:  1    Limit: 12         PIN Required

Buddhist Traditions of East Asia
Spring Semester Online
Lisa Grumbach

Introduces the Buddhist Traditions as they originated in India and developed throughout South and Southeast Asia. Second half of the required year long introductory survey of the entire Buddhist tradition. Course format: Online Lecture. Evaluation method: Participation/Term paper. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute for Buddhist Studies.
HRHS-8152    3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: November 9-20, 2009
           

Readings in Mahayana Texts
Spring Semester Online
Taigen Daniel Leighton

This online course will feature textual study of selected chapters of the Lotus Sutra, a central scripture in Chinese Buddhism, and even more pivotal in Japan. Through colorful parables and shifting visionary viewpoints, the Lotus Sutra elaborates and expresses such key East Asian Buddhist themes as the subtle workings of skillful means; the Diversity of spiritual needs and approaches and their unity in the One Vehicle; the mystical pervasion of awakening beings in both space and time; and the centrality of faith to Buddhist awakening. In addition to examining the meaning of the sutra’s teachings and their relevance to modern spiritual concerns, we will also consider the sutra’s influence on Japanese art and literature, and commentaries on the sutra by some key East Asian Buddhist figures. Prerequisites: Some Introductory course in Buddhism, including the Mahayana. Course format: Online Discussion. Evaluation method: term paper, midterm exam, participation in discussions. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute for Buddhist Studies.
HR-8317         3 units 
Minimum: 1      Limit: 20           No PIN Required
Next Registration Period: November 9-20, 2009
           

History of Shin Buddhist Tradition
Spring Semester Online
Galen Amstutz

This course takes the history of the Shin Buddhist Tradition forward from the seven masters, examining the formation of tradition by Shinran and its revitalization by Rennyo, as well as further developments into the Tokugawa. Required of IBS ministerial aspirants. HRHS-3250 History of the Pure Land Tradition recommended as background. Class format: Online discussion. Evaluation method: Participation/term paper. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute for Buddhist Studies.
HRHS-8370    3 units
No Limit           No PIN Required
Next Registration Period: November 9-20, 2009
           

Topics in Japanese Religions: Buddhism and Landscape
Spring Semester Online
Lisa Grumbach

This course explores Japanese Buddhism and kami worship (Shinto) through the theoretical lens of landscape. Topics will include: the influence of geography (islands, mountains, plains, oceans) on the conceptions of kami (gods) in early Japan; ideas about landscape and space in Japanese Buddhism; how Buddhist doctrine is taught trhough landsapce art; the practical and theoretical roles of temple and shrine architecture, grounds, and gardens; pilgrimage as movement through religious space/landscape; and changing ideas about religion and nature in modern Japan. Course format: Online Lecture. Evaluation Method: Participation/ Term paper. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute for Buddhist Studies.
HRHS-8450    3 units
No Limit           No PIN Required
Next Registration Period: November 9-20, 2009

Psychological Aspects of Buddhism I
Srping Semester Online
Gordon Bermant

An examination of the development of psychological theories in the abhidharma, Yogācara and tathāgatagarbha systems of thought, particularly through the reading of primary sources in translation. May be repeated for credit when different primary texts are being studied. Course format: Online discussion. Evaluation method: Participation/term paper. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute for Buddhist Studies.
HRPS-8320    3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: August 31-September 4, 2009
           

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

Monday 

Reformation Images of Dissent
9:40a.m.-12:30 p.m., Mondays
Nada Velimirović
This course examines images and texts emerging from the radical wing of the Protestant Reformation in the 16th and 17th centuries. Comparing the iconoclastic uprising in Holland to an image of defeated Unitarians in Poland, we will examine the different outcomes of the struggle for supremacy between words and images.  These studies will provide the context for an investigation of the formation of theological identities, especially Unitarians and Universalists.  The course’s objective is to make history come alive by offering students an opportunity to engage in close examinations and analyses of theological dissent through historical and contemporary images and texts. 
HSRA 4655    3 units
Minimum 5      Limit 25          No PIN Required
Fireside Room

Engaging Contexts:  An Exploration of the Interplay of Culture, Self and Values
2:10-5:00 p.m., Mondays
Laura Farha
What impact does cultural context have on counseling and pastoral care?  What influences the provision of care and what influences its reception?  What does culturally appropriate pastoral care look like?  The objective of this course is to facilitate a process wherein students deepen their awareness of the interplay between personal experience and the valuing of cultural practices and norms.  The course will utilize student presentations along with literature and journal articles to explore developmental milestones in various cultural contexts.  The course will consist of an exploration of several cultures by looking at specific topics that act as life-transition points (leaving home, completing formal education, starting work, partnering, becoming a parent, dying/death).  Students will be asked to select one topic and present information on that topic for each culture with which we will be engaging (including his/her own).  Student presentations will begin collective conversations that engage cultural contexts, illuminate cultural variations and consider whether these developmental milestones are cultural and historical constructions or moral absolutes.  The course will culminate in a personal mapping of the student’s values and any shifts experienced during the course (to be submitted as a final paper). 
PSRS 4149      3 units
Minimum 6      Limit 18          No PIN Required
Fireside Room

One2One: Pastoral Care Basics
7:10-9:40 p.m., Mondays
Kurt A. Kuhwald
* CANCELLED *
An experiential course focusing on the basic conditions necessary for authenticity, relevance and efficacy in Pastoral Counseling and Spiritual Directions.  This class will work with the core elements and practical behaviors necessary to meet individuals in a pastoral relationship.  Practical experience will be emphasized.  The course will draw on the instructor's training/experience with Dr. Carl Rogers and the Religious of the Sacred Heart.  As a foundation, Howard Clinebell's Basic Types of Pastoral Care and Counseling will be used.
PS 4017           3 units
Minimum 6      Limit 16          PIN Required
Fireside Room
* CANCELLED *

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

Tuesday 

Dr. Howard Thurman – The Search for Common Ground in the 21st Century
2:10-5:00 p.m., Tuesday
Dorsey Blake
Considered a 20th Century prophet by historian Lerone Bennett, Dr. Howard Thurman created a body of spiritual insights exploring the relation between mysticism and social action.  This course will focus on comprehending the ideal of community as expressed through the thought and ministry of Dr. Howard Thurman. A goal of this course will be the discernment of evidence of oneness across racial, sexual, cultural, religious, and national boundaries. A crucial objective will be the embracing of spiritual discipline as an essential method for engaging the search for common ground in the 21st Century.
RSSP 4568      3 units            
Minimum:  1    Limit: 15         PIN Required
Fireside Room

Introduction to Theater of the Oppressed
7:10-9:40 pm, Tuesdays
Jiwon Chung
Theater of the Oppressed is a collection of games, techniques, exercises for using theater as a vehicle for personal and social change.  It is a method of harnessing the laboratory of the theater as a powerful tool for exploring power, transforming oppression, and finding community-building solutions to the problems of inequality, conflict and injustice. Based on the radical ideas of Paolo Freire and Augusto Boal, it is a collective artistic exploration into the fullest expression of our human dignity, potential and creativity. This is a full semester workshop covering the theory, application and facilitation of Theater of the Oppressed including: demechanization, dynamization, image theater, forum theater, rainbow of desire, theory and pedagogy, and jokering (facilitation).  The workshop will culminate in a one or multiple (interactive) forum theater pieces for the community. The workshop will be 80% experiential and 20% reflective/didactic. 
RSED 4036     3 units
Minimum 5      Limit 40          No PIN Required
Fireside Room

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

Wednesday 

Congregational Life and Administration
2:10-5:00 p.m., Wednesdays
Charla Weiss
Church administration and volunteer ministry is a science and an art.  As a science, church administration involves procedures and techniques that can be learned by study and by practice.  As an art, administration and working with volunteers calls for relational sensitivity, intuition and timing.  Learn how to create and monitor a church budget, how to work with accountants, bookkeepers and/or volunteer finance committees, how to navigate your compensation with the church, and other routine church finance activities.  Case studies, readings, observation, and discussion will inform students to the basics of church administration.
FT 4071           3 units
Minimum 1      Limit 30          No PIN Required
Fireside Room

Forgiveness
7:10-9:40 p.m., Wednesdays
Christine Fry
“Forgiveness honors the heart’s greatest dignity.  Whenever we are lost, it brings us back to the ground of love.  With forgiveness we become unwilling to attack or wish harm to another.  Whenever we forgive, in small ways at home, or in great ways between nations, we free ourselves from the past.” --  Jack Kornfield
“Without forgiveness, there really is no future.”-- Desmond Tutu
This is a class in forgiveness.  Students will covenant to learn and practice forgiveness together.  They will gain skills in forgiveness which have been demonstrated to improve people’s health and well-being.  They will discover how people all over the world - today and in times past - have understood and used forgiveness as a tool for healing and liberation.  As a result of this class, their skills in both pastoral and prophetic ministry will be strengthened so that they might promote forgiveness in whatever settings they find themselves.
PS 4095           3 units            
Minimum: 1     Limit: 20         No PIN Required       
Fireside Room

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

Thursday 

Sources for a Liberating Ethical Imagination
9:40 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Thursdays
Gabriella Lettini
Our ethical imagination can help us to challenge oppressive systems, to bear witness to the voices of the forgotten, and to imagine, create and sustain alternative, liberating ways of being.  This foundational course will explore the role of theo/alogies and ethics in shaping our ethical imagination and in promoting individual and collective practices of justice.  It will also encourage interdisciplinary work among theo/alogies, ethics, the arts and popular culture, as works of art will also be considered as sources for ethical imagination.  Readings will include works by selected liberation, feminist, womanist, mujerista and queer theo/alogians, as well as by ethicists and philosophers.  Visits by guest theologians, artists and activists will also enrich our perspective.
CEST 4559      3 units             
Minimum: 5      Limit:  20          PIN Required                
Fireside Room

Preach It!
2:10-5:00 p.m., Thursdays    
Kurt A. Kuhwald
Theories abound about how to construct authentic sermons.  In the non-exegetical homiletic path of Unitarian Universalism/Liberal religion, there is another possibility.  This experiential preaching course will focus on finding your authentic style and voice.  In constructing sermons, we will encounter: Presence.  Power.  Passion.  Humility.  Humor.  The truth in one's chest and gut---the body somehow singing through thought.  Further, we will explore tapping the neural ground of connection between speaker and listener and seek sources of relevance for words that speak truth, lift hope, inspire action and offer blessing.  A preacher for 14 years, a public speaker for over 30, the instructor loves the pulpit whether in a house of worship, on the street, or in the halls of government.
HM 4005         3 Units            
Minimum:  1     Limit: 15        PIN Required
Fireside Room

Sufi Dhikr: Remembrance of the Divine
7:10-9:40 pm, Thursdays
Yassir Chadly
“If you remember Me, I will remember You”--Qur’an 2:152.  Throughout the world Sufism is identified as the mystical dimension of Islam emphasizing the student's journey towards higher states of consciousness and unity with The Divine. Just as the surfer becomes one with the wave so does the human heart become one with The Eternal through the practice of Dhikr, remembrance of The Divine.  In this experiential course students will explore the many facets of Dhikr, including chanting, prayer, meditation, Qur’anic recitation, movement, and music. Sufi communities, or “tariqas,” are found throughout the world and vary from country to country. This course will touch upon many different traditions and focus primarily on the Naqshbandi tradition from Dagistan.
HR 4816         3 units
Minimum: 5     Limit: 15         No PIN Required
Fireside Room

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

Friday 

Buddhist Critique on Hinduism
9:40 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Fridays
Jo Sanzgiri
* CANCELLED *

Buddhist principles in the context of their radical departure from Hinduism are examined.  The ways in which Buddhist art, particularly the cave temples at Ajanta (in Aurangabad, India) symbolize a new frontier for a developing merchant class will be re-interpreted.  Reasons for the decline of Hinduism, together with the increasing influence of Buddhism and Jainism in ancient India, will also deepen our contextual approach.  We use scholarly writing, art, and related videos to enrich our dialogue on this complex period of multiple faiths emerging in South East Asia. 
HR 4630         3 units
Minimum 1      Limit 15          No PIN Required
Fireside Room
* CANCELLED *

The Grace of Anti-Racist Praxis
2:10-5:00 p.m., Fridays
Mary P. Foran
* CANCELLED *
This course is designed to support students in their quests for models, tools and practices that will sustain them in working to manifest more love and justice in their personal and professional relationships and in their congregations and communities.  With an emphasis on anti-racism, we will explore what sustaining anti-racist, anti-oppressive practices throughout our lives requires.  We will go beyond our comfort zones to reach past what we think we already know.  Preparation for this course includes completing the SKSM ECO/Thresholds Seminar or other equivalent background.  Students who wish to enroll should have at least a beginning sense of how racism and other oppressions create pain and suffering in their own lives and the lives of others.  This course is taught by a Starr King Teaching Fellow.
RS 4198          3 units
Minimum: 4     Limit: 12         PIN Required
Fireside Room
* CANCELLED *

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

Saturday 

No courses are currently scheduled on Saturdays

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

To Be Announced 

Community Fieldwork Spring
TBA
Gabriella Lettini
Community Fieldwork includes work in gender, racial and economic justice, queer activism, disability advocacy, immigration issues, environmental responsibility, civil liberties protection, HIV response, youth at risk, peace building, participating in a fundraising campaign for a non for profit or grassroots organization and more. Please arrange with the professor.
FE 4062           1 to 5 units
Minimum:  1     Limit:  25          PIN Required    

Congregational Fieldwork Spring
TBA
Kurt Kuhwald
Fieldwork in Unitarian Universalist congregations includes teaching a religious education class for children or adults, working with a youth group, participating in a stewardship campaign and more. Please arrange with the professor.
FE 4052          1 to 5 units     
Minimum:  1    Limit: 25         PIN Required

Community Internship Spring
TBA
Gabriella Lettini
Community Internships involve supervised placements in a non-profit service agency or grassroots organization, hospice work, literacy counseling and more. Those who register for this course should also register for Community Intern Reflection Fall. Arrangements should be made with the professor.
FE 4221           5 to 10 units    
Minimum:  1     Limit:  25          PIN Required    

Community Intern Reflection Spring
TBA
Gabriella Lettini
All SKSM students involved in community internships will meet together for reflection on their work, as it is only through the processes of theological reflection and critical reflection on experience that field work becomes field education. This class is designed to broaden and to deepen students' analytic perspective on their field site contexts and on their roles as religious leaders and professionals. Students will be grow in their ability to think and learn in a praxis oriented way, that is, allowing situations of practice to deepen and challenge their academic knowledge about theo/alogies, and allowing their academic knowledge of theology to deepen and challenge their ministerial practice. In field-based experiences the depth of students’ learning depends entirely upon how well they can implement praxis oriented learning. Arrange with Instructor. All participants will be expected to attend a gathering on January 27, 2010.
FE 4223           2 units             
Minimum:  1     Limit: 25           No PIN Required    

Clinical Pastoral Education
TBA
Gabriella Lettini
This is for Starr King Students engaged in part-time or full-time Clinical Pastoral Education.  Participate in ministry to persons, and in individual group reflection upon that ministry. Theoretical material from theology, the behavioral sciences, and pastoral care.  Integrates theological understanding and knowledge of behavioral science into pastoral functioning.  Upon completion, a written evaluation from the program supervisor will be placed into the student's permanent files.  Arrange with your advisor or the Director of Studies in Public Ministry.
FE 4012           1-10 units        
No Limit         No PIN Required    

Parish Internship Spring
TBA
Kurt Kuhwald
This is a 6-10 month full-time or part-time experience in a teaching congregation under the supervision of a Minister in final Fellowship, an intern committee, and the professor.  Those who register for this course should also register for Parish Intern Reflection Spring.
FE 4211          5-10 units 
Minimum:  1    Limit: 25         PIN Required

Parish Intern Reflection Spring
TBA
Kurt Kuhwald
All Starr King students working as interns in Unitarian Universalist congregations are expected to participate in this time of reflection on their ministerial work. All participants will be expected to attend the Starr King Intern Gathering on January 26-27, 2010.
FE 4213          2 units                        
Minimum:  1    Limit: 25         PIN Required

MASC Project
TBA
Gabriella Lettini
For SKSM Master of Arts in Religious Leadership for Social Change (MASC) students only.  MASC students should sign up for this class during the semesters when they are producing their final project representative of their learning during the program.  A copy of the project will be placed in a public collection at the school.
MA 5300         1-12 units
No Limit         No PIN Required                

In Thesis
TBA
Faculty
All Masters level students in the GTU community should use this designation if they are working on their thesis.
MA 5000         1-12 units
No Limit         No PIN Required

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | To Be Announced

 

2008-2009
Fall / Intersession / Spring / Summer / Saturday Intensives / Online

2009-2010
Fall / Intersession / Spring / Summer / Online

Click to view the Starr King catalog in PDF format. (Note: Seminary for the Laity certificate program is no longer offered.)

 

 


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