Fall 2011

2011 - 2012 Courses - Fall Semester

(Summer 2011 intensive course listings: Summer 2011 Courses.)

Registration Dates for Fall 2011

Please note that registration is closed for Fall 2011 courses.

  • Fall 2011 Early Registration: Apr. 4-15, 2011
  • Fall 2011 General Registration: Aug. 22–Sept. 2, 2011

Instruction begins September 6, 2011.

To register for a course if you are not in a degree program at Starr King or the GTU, please see "How to Register for a Starr King Course".

Students enrolled in a degree program at Starr King School (or any other Graduate Theological Union school) should follow the registration processes outlined by their school’s registrar.  Starr King’s processes are listed in the Starr King Student Handbook (password required to view).

Starr King Tuition and Course Fees.

Newly designated E.C.O. courses for 2011-2012: Dr. Howard Thurman - The Search for Common Ground in the 21st Century; Apocalypse Now!; Sources for a Liberating Ethical Imagination; Quranic Studies: Major Themes and Narratives; and Promised Lands and Immigrants (online).

 
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Fall 2011 Online, Immersion, and Residential Courses

Online | Immersion | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday |
Friday | Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

~NEW course added~ Sacred and the Substance (Mondays 7:10pm, Residential)

Online Courses 

UU Congregational Polity ~NEW~
Emily Mace
This is a course in the history and development of Congregational Polity in the Unitarian Universalist tradition. How did Congregational Polity evolve and what were the differences in the Unitarian and Universalist approaches to governance? How have we handled issues of centralized authority and bureaucracy? We’ll look at how religious communities make decisions, support their leaders and define ministry. With ministry we will ask about power, gender and ethics, the call, and the meaning and context for worship and rites of passage. / Emily R. Mace received her doctoral degree in religious studies in 2010 from Princeton University, where she specialized in the study of American religious history. She holds an M.T.S. in Christianity and Culture from Harvard Divinity School and a B.A. in Religion from Amherst College. Her scholarship focuses on religious liberalism in the late nineteenth century and emphasizes issues of practice, ritual, gender, and pluralism. Mace’s dissertation explored how radical religious liberals sought to embody an eclectic cosmopolitanism in their religious practices, looking at practice of fellowship, dedication ceremonies, religious education courses, holidays, and compiled bibles. Currently she serves as an adjunct instructor in the humanities at Brevard College in the mountains of Western North Carolina and has taught the UU History course at Starr King.
FT-8420  3 Units
Minimum 5 Limit 25 Pin Required: Yes
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).
Next Registration Period: Aug. 22-2011-Sept. 2, 2011

Forgiveness
Chris Fry
“Forgiveness honors the heart’s greatest dignity. Whenever we are lost, it brings us back to the ground of love. With forgiveness we become unwilling to attack or wish harm to another. Whenever we forgive, in small ways at home, or in great ways between nations, we free ourselves from the past.” ~Jack Kornfield / In this year-long, online class we will meet people from all over the world who have practiced forgiveness as a means of healing, peace, and liberation. Through films, readings, and spiritual exercises we will explore responsible ways of responding to wrongdoing through forgiveness, reconciliation and/or repair. We will also develop our own "forgiveness practices" so that we can use forgiveness, as appropriate, in our lives and ministries. This course will draw on the wisdom and practices of Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Buddhism as well as positive psychology, poetry, and neuroscience. First semester will focus on the development of "forgiveness practices" and interpersonal forgiveness. Second semester will address the larger contexts (e.g., communities, institutions, nations) in which forgiveness, reconciliation, and/or repair may counter oppression and create more just, joyful and sustainable ways of living. / The Rev. Chris Fry is a grateful graduate of Starr King School for the Ministry (‘96). An Adjunct Faculty member for more than five years, Chris has taught courses on poetry, illness and pastoral care; forgiveness; compassion and moral repair; and religious education. She offers “Write for Health” groups and spiritual direction, coordinates her church’s small group ministry, and is active in an interfaith shelter program in her hometown of Davis, CA.
PS-8430          1.5 Units       
Minimum 5       Limit 22            Pin Required: Yes
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).
Next Registration Period: Aug. 22–Sept. 2, 2011


Adult Faith Development
Rudra Dundzila
The Adult Faith Development course explores the theory and practice of adult faith formation. It emphasizes Fowler’s stages of faith development, Gilligan’s stages of faith development, Gardner’s multiple intelligences, Krathwohl’s Taxonomy of the Affective Domain, Groome’s shared praxis, Moran’s adult religious education, and Unitarian Universalist Process Theology. It will distinguish between spiritual development and religious education. It will survey select, exemplary faith development programs to explore their best practices. Participants will experiment with the programs, and will reflect on their learning experiences. The program will tentatively conclude with participants developing unique adult faith development programming that they could implement in their congregations. / Dr. Vilius Rudra Dundzila is a Unitarian Universalist minister in preliminary fellowship and Professor of Humanities and Comparative Religion for Harry S. Truman College (City Colleges of Chicago). He has conducted spiritual direction, groups, and retreats for Gay men. He currently serves as the director of the Illinois Religious Coalition for the Freedom to Marry.
EDRS-8470          3 Units       
Minimum 5       Limit 20            Pin Required: Yes
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).
Next Registration Period: Aug. 22–Sept. 2, 2011


Dynamic Youth Ministry
Megan Dowdell and Betty Jeanne Rueters-Ward
This lively and interactive on-line course grounds participants in philosophical, psychological, programmatic, ethical and theological aspects of youth ministry. Geared particularly toward Unitarian Universalists, but open to all, this course seeks to embody a vision of youth ministry that is a vibrant, robust, and flexible part of every congregation. Topics of instruction include leadership and spiritual development, professional support for youth advisors, denominational polity, adolescent life issues, building intergenerational community, and a critical analysis of different models of youth ministry and programming. Includes a praxis-immersion component tailored to the student’s local/global context. Recommended for all religious leaders, both new and old to youth ministry.

Listen to an introduction to this course as offered in the fall of 2010. The speaker is Betty Jeanne Rueters-Ward, one of the course instructors:

Dynamic Youth Ministry from Starr King Acad Affairs on Vimeo.

Megan Dowdell is a Unitarian Universalist lay leader, graduate of Starr King School for the Ministry, and current PhD student at the Graduate Theological Union. She served as the first Youth Trustee-at-Large on the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) Board of Trustees, and co-convened the Association’s Consultation on Youth Ministry with the Rev. Dr. Bill Sinkford, then the UUA President. Previously, she served as a mentor for the YMCA Y-Scholars program, helping first-generation college-bound students achieve their goals. / Betty Jeanne Rueters-Ward is a lifelong Unitarian Universalist and full-time Youth and Young Adult Program Coordinator at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Shelter Rock. She is a graduate of the newly-established Master of Arts in Religious Leadership for Social Change at Starr King. As a Youth Programs Specialist for the Unitarian Universalist Association, Betty Jeanne coordinated international conferences, trainings and social justice initiatives. She has also served as a youth advisor at the First Unitarian Church of Oakland, as a youth mentor for OutLoud Radio, and with youth clients at Carroll Center for the Blind. / Megan and Betty Jeanne bring over two decades of experience in youth ministry. Individually and as a team, they have consulted with Unitarian Universalist congregations, districts, camps and conferences on multigenerational community building, youth ministry, and other issues.
EDFT-8462          3 Units       
Minimum 5       Limit 25            Pin Required: Yes
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).
Next Registration Period: Aug. 22–Sept. 2, 2011

Promised Lands and Immigrants
Hugo Córdova Quero
This online course will focus on the cases of Latina/o immigrants in the United States and Japan in relation to their experiences of faith, ethnicity and gender. The approach is interdisciplinary as we will draw from several fields for the analysis of the class topics. The goal of the course is to provide grounds for students to acquire tools for understanding the different realities of immigrants. Issues of faith, race/ethnicity, gender and migration will be constantly connected to pastoral reflection throughout the course, especially since our world is increasingly becoming multicultural, multiethnic and multi-religious. This course fulfills the E.C.O. requirement.

Listen to a description of the course as offered during Spring 2010 (Justin Waters introduces the the speaker, course instructor Hugo Córdova Quero):

Promised Lands and Immigrants Course Introduction from Starr King Acad Affairs on Vimeo.

Instructor Hugo Córdova Quero holds a Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies from the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California. He is also visiting researcher at the Center for Lusophone Studies at Sophia University, in Tokyo. He has worked both pastorally and academically in Argentina, United States, Hong Kong and Tokyo. During 2006 to 2008 he conducted fieldwork in seven Roman Catholic parishes, interviewing Japanese Brazilian migrants who are currently residing in Tokyo Metropolitan Area. He has published in several journals and books, and he is currently editing books in the areas of migration and theology, gender, queer theology and queer theory.
View the syllabus (pdf) for this course.
RSHR-8427          3 Units       
Minimum 5       Limit 18            Pin Required: Yes
Next Registration Period: Aug. 22–Sept. 2, 2011
           

Buddhist Traditions of South Asia
Natalie Quli

Introduces the Buddhist traditions as they originated in India and developed throughout South and Southeast Asia. First half of the required year-long introductory survey of the entire Buddhist tradition. Usually offered each fall semester. Course format: Online discussion. Evaluation method: Participation/Term paper. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute of Buddhist Studies.
HRHS-8151    3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: Aug. 22–Sept. 2, 2011
           

Introduction to Shin Buddhist Thought
Matsumoto

Introduces the major ideas of Shin thought in the context of contemporary religious and philosophic discussions. Evaluation based on participation in discussion forums and final research paper. Intended audience: MA/MTS and MDiv. [HR 1550 or Faculty permission required]. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute of Buddhist Studies.
HR-8140    3 units
No Limit           [HR-1550 or Faculty permission required]
Next Registration Period: Aug. 22–Sept. 2, 2011
           

Shin Buddhist Theology ~ cancelled
Matsumoto

An examination of a range of theological issues raised by a contemporary consideration of Shin Buddhist thought, focusing on questions of ethics, human nature, faith and salvation. Lecture and seminar format. Evaluation based on student participation in classroom discussions and final research paper. Intended for MDiv and MA/MTS students. Prerequisites: HR-1614 or instructor's permission. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute of Buddhist Studies.
HR-8457    3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: Aug. 22–Sept. 2, 2011 ~ cancelled
           

Buddhist Japanese I
Kurioka

Introduces basics of Japanese grammar, vocabulary, kana & kanji, and dictionary work, including both Buddhist vocabulary and dictionaries. Work with paragraph length selections from modern popular Japanese publications on Buddhism. Course format: Lecture. Evaluation method: Participation/ Homework Assignments/ Exams. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute of Buddhist Studies.
HR-8145    3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: Aug. 22–Sept. 2, 2011
           

Tibetan Buddhism
Harrington

For centuries Tibet and Tibetan Buddhists have held an allure and mystique in the minds of westerners and others that is akin to that of the magical kingdom of Shangri-La.This seminar will draw on key histories, myths, poems, images, biographies and religious discourses to explore the core philosophies and practices of Tibetan Buddhism, as well as the ways in which Tibetan Buddhism has been mythologized by Tibetans and non-Tibetans alike. Course requirements include weekly posts in the class discussion board, an independent field trip to selected site, 3 short essays and a Final Reflective Paper. It is appropriate to graduate students of any background. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute of Buddhist Studies.
HR-8301    3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: Aug. 22–Sept. 2, 2011
           

Topics in Japanese Religions: Buddhism and Shinto in Japanese History
Grumbach

Explores the relationship between Shinto and Buddhism through the course of Japanese history, from the advent of Buddhism to Japan, to the various associations and combinations of the two traditions, and their forced separation by the government at the end of the 19th century. Prerequisites: Assumes some knowledge of Japanese religion, culture and/or language. Course format: Online discussion.Evaluation method: Participation/Term paper. This course is co-sponsored by Starr King School for the Ministry and the Institute of Buddhist Studies.
HRHS-8450    3 units
No Limit           NO PIN Required
Next Registration Period: Aug. 22–Sept. 2, 2011


Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

Fall Immersion Courses

North American U.U. History: Boston Immersion  ~NEW~
November 18 – November 21, 2011
Susan Ritchie

The Boston immersion course will include the traditional content of a North American UU history classes in a dynamic setting. We will explore the Unitarian engagement with the Civil War alongside a trip to the Shaw memorial on Boston Common; discuss Emerson's Divinity School Address from the very hall in which it was delivered. We will grapple with the profound issues of the Black Empowerment movement from the floor of the Arlington Street Church, where the delegates disappointed by the actions of that General Assembly gathered. Our ambivalence regarding formal association will be discussed from within the offices of the UUA itself and with UUA officials; as we learn of our complicated relationship to class, we will explore the Beacon Hill neighborhood. We can accompany our discussion of the reinvention of 20th century Universalism with a trip to the Charles Street Meeting House. Touring the Athenaeum, we both encounter and discuss the Unitarian transformation of 19th century literature. And more! Students will be given the opportunity, if desired, to room at Pickett & Eliot House, the bed and breakfast facility of the UUA, where room sharing may be available. Students will be expected to have read David Robison's book, "The Unitarians and the Universalists" before arriving. Class begins F, 11/18/11, at 8:30am, and runs through M, 11/21/11; meeting to start at the Pickett & Eliot House, 7 Mount Vernon Place, Boston, MA.
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).

HSFT 4007                     3 Units
Minimum 5    Limit 15      PIN Required: Yes
Pickett & Eliot House, 7 Mount Vernon Place, Boston, MA
Next Registration Period: Aug. 22–Sept. 2, 2011


Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

Residential Courses

Monday 

Leadership, Liturgy and Learning I: Methods and Context
9:40 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., Mondays
Michelle Favreault


Members of the class will design and lead Tuesday Chapel services (one as leader, others as a part of a team) during the fall semester.  The course will include a study of the history and traditions of worship in Unitarian Universalist congregational contexts, emphasizing the role of liturgist as leader of faith formation in religious community.  Readings will be drawn from the work of 20th century and contemporary Unitarian Universalist worship scholars.  Please note: Sessions take place each Monday 10 a.m.-12pm, and 1-1:45 pm Tuesday during SKSM Chapel
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).

FT 4012     3 Units
Minimum 5 Limit 14             PIN Required: Yes
Fireside Room


Testimony as Community and Congregational Revival
2:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Mondays
Dexter Thomas


This seminar is designed to explore the ancient practice of testimony in an effort to highlight the ways in which it can be a springboard for congregational renewal. It will address ways in which testimony can serve as a catalyst for restoration among broken down communities, and how congregants can be authentic about their personal beliefs and share their faith with conviction. Discussions will focus on traditional ways of sharing faith, and redeeming the rich art of testimony. Discussion would also explore testimony in community organizing and empowerment among the disenfranchised.
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).

FT 4034      3 Units
Minimum 5 Limit 15             PIN Required: No
Fireside Room

Music Art and Social Change ~NEW~
7:10pm – 9:40pm, Mondays
Octavio Carrasco

This class will explore the power of art to influence and sustain social change. Creative acts are important as re-affirmative aspects of the human experience as well as tools for communication. The course will present the works of musicians, film makers, artists and authors exploring how art has been used to inform and unify people in times of conflict.  We will consider art as a transformative and potentially liberatory practice.  We will combine our the use of our senses along with our minds to engage with different creative mediums as well as exploring our own creative potential to understand how music and art shape our lives and our worldviews.
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).

RARS 4002           3 Units
Minimum 1         Maximum: 15   PIN Required: Yes
Fireside Room

~NEW~ Sacred and the Substance
Mondays, 7:10pm - 9:40pm
Ayize Jama-Everett
Taught not from a place of oppression or celebration, this course seeks to interrogate the history and current day uses of “drugs”.  Questioning not only the overarching category, this course will also examine how those who utilize drugs in their lives on a regular basis, from shamans to chaotic using addicts, are impacted psychologically, physically, and spiritually.  The quality and nature of drugs will also be examined in light of their prescribed benefits and risks.  We will be interrogating the history of Drug Laws in the United States from the Harrison Act to the current war on drugs, looking at the responses of drug utilizing communities, from A.A. to Harm reduction.  Through it all, we will be searching for the ways in which spirituality, religion, and faith are utilized by both sides. 

RSPS 4291 3 Units
Minimum 1     Limit 20  Pin Required: No
Reading Room

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 

Tuesday 

Dr. Howard Thurman - The Search for Common Ground in the 21st Century
2:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Tuesdays
Dorsey Blake


Considered a 20th Century prophet by historian Lerone Bennett, Dr. Howard Thurman created a body of spiritual insights exploring between mysticism and social action. This course will focus on comprehending the ideal of community as expressed through the thought and ministry of Dr. Howard Thurman. A goal of this course will be the discernment of evidence of oneness across racial, sexual, cultural, religious, and national boundaries. A crucial objective will be the embracing of spiritual discipline as an essential method for engaging the search for common ground in the 21st Century.
View the syllabus for this course (pdf). This course fulfills the E.C.O. requirement.

RSSP 4568  3 Units
Minimum 5 Limit 30             PIN Required: Yes
Fireside Room


Apocalypse Now!
7:10 p.m. - 9:40 p.m., Tuesdays
Kurt Kuhwald


The course will be grounded in current studies exploring the possible/probable collapse of 21st century global civilization.  Extensive  reading and research in scientific texts, reference to ancient writings as well as the use of depth psychologies and modern/post modern transformational strategies will propel our work.  Two powerful dynamics characterize and dominate our times: That we could lose it all; and that there are two powerful opposing global forces at play—regeneration/revolution and destruction.  In light of that reality, our goal will be to lay the groundwork for a post civilization consciousness that is rooted in both thea/ological/cosmological depth and activist empowerment that will assist us in developing collective survival strategies and personal/individual transformation. This course fulfills the E.C.O. requirement.
View the syllabus for this course (pdf) and the required text books.

CEPS 4960  3 Units
Minimum 5 Limit 14             PIN Required: No
Fireside Room

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
Wednesday 

Dr. King and Empire: How MLK Jr. Resisted War, Capitalism & Christian Fundamentalism ~NEW~
9:40am – 12:30pm, Wednesdays
Be Scofield

You know Dr. King had a dream, but did you know he also resisted the nightmare of Empire? This first-of-its kind course will examine the lesser-understood and more radical dimensions of Dr. King’s life.  Beginning with Dr. King’s seminary and graduate years, his philosophical influences and Unitarian inspired theology will be investigated. The course will then look at the shifting of Dr. King’s views towards Malcolm X’s on white people and racism in America. Next, King’s resistance to capitalism will be explored. He moved himself and his family into the slums of Chicago in 1966, called for a guaranteed annual income and was planning a national rally against poverty in Washington D.C. Finally, the course will examine Dr. King’s courageous and bold stance against the Vietnam War and U.S. Imperialism. His relationships to other religious anti-war leaders such as Thich Nhat Hanh and Abraham Joschual Heschel will also be looked at. Visit www.radicalking.com for the course readings and syllabus. COURSE FORMAT: Lecture & Discussion
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).

RS 4256 3 Units
Minimum 1         Limit 30                 PIN Required: No
Fireside Room

Quranic Studies: Major Themes and Narratives
2:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Wednesdays
Ghazala Anwar

In this course, in conjunction with scholarship on the major themes and narrative of the Quran, the students will also be reading the text of the Quran directly (through translations) and enacting some of the narratives for an embodied understanding of the texts.  Gender analysis will be one of the ways that the Quranic stories will be read.  The critical methods applied to the study of the narratives will include gender analysis.  The course will taught within an Islamic context simulated through the sound of the Azhan (call to prayer) and exposure to Islamic art. PhD students will be required to write a 5,000 word research paper on a topic chosen by individual students and approved by the instructor. This course fulfills the E.C.O. requirement.
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).

HRBS 4828            3 Units
Minimum 5  Limit 15        PIN Required: Yes
Round Chapel

Theater of the Oppressed
7:10 p.m. - 9:40 p.m., Wednesdays
Jiwon Chung


Theater of the Oppressed is a collection of games, techniques, exercises for using theater as a vehicle for personal and social change. It is a method of harnessing the laboratory of the theater as a powerful tool for exploring power, transforming oppression, and finding community-building solutions to the problems of inequality, conflict and injustice. Based on the radical ideas of Paolo Freire and Augusto Boal, it is a collective artistic exploration into the fullest expression of our human dignity, potential and creativity. This full semester workshop will cover theory, application and facilitation of TO and will culminate in a one or more (interactive) forum theater pieces for the community. The workshop will be 80% experiential and 20% reflective/didactic. No prior theater experience is necessary.
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).

RSED 4036 3 Units
Minimum 5 Limit 30             PIN Required: No
Fireside Room

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
Thursday 

Sources for a Liberating Ethical Imagination
9:40 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., Thursdays
Gabriella Lettini


Our ethical imagination can help us to challenge oppressive systems, to bear witness to the voices of the forgotten, and to imagine, create and sustain alternative, liberating ways of being.  This foundational course will start with an introduction to ethics and then explore the role of traditionally underrepresented voices in the academy in shaping our ethical imagination and in promoting individual and collective practices of justice.  It will also encourage interdisciplinary work among theo/alogies, ethics, the arts and popular culture, as works of art will also be considered as sources for the ethical imagination.  Readings will include works by selected liberation, feminist, womanist, mujerista and queer theo/alogians, as well as by ethicists and philosophers.  Movies and visits by guest theologians, artists and activists will also enrich our perspective. This course fulfills the E.C.O. requirement.
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).

CEST 2000  3 Units
Minimum 5 Limit 25             PIN Required: Yes
Fireside Room


Caring and the Spiritual Life

2:10 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Thursdays
Charles Garfield


Renowned psychiatrist C. G. Jung demonstrated in his practice that “healing a soul in crisis is an art requiring empathy, patience, a shrewd yet sympathetic understanding of human nature and, above all, heart.” The “broken heart” is not just an evocative image, but also a spiritual, psychological and medical reality. In our fragmented society, the lack of human companionship is one of the leading causes of illness and premature death. Every year, tens of thousands die, quite literally, of a broken heart. This course will focus on: how a caring presence is central to the healing process; arousing empathy, the heart of connection, as central to ministering to the lost, lonely, sick, bereaved, and brokenhearted; identifying the motivations, risks, and rewards of entering into a close relationship with the frail elderly, poor, homeless, abused, chronically ill, or those at the end of life.  In addition, we will ask: How can we develop empathy, the capacity to see, hear, and feel a situation from another person’s vantage point? Can those in religious life honestly claim to know another person’s suffering? Why do we enter into – or sometimes resist – solidarity with those in the grip of suffering?
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).

SPPS 4319    3 Units
Minimum 12  Limit 30             PIN Required: No
Fireside Room


Unitarian Universalist Theologies: Modernity and Postmodernity
7:10 p.m. - 9:40 p.m., Thursdays
Nada Velimirovic


The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to distinctive theological perspectives present within Unitarian Universalist traditions and congregations, and to equip students to begin to think and write theologically in the context of post-modern religious communities and culture. Unitarian Universalism will serve as a case study in post-modern religious community and as a specific location for theological reflection. Especially oriented to students who identify as Unitarian Universalists, participants in this course will be encouraged to form a practice of engaged theological thinking within the context of Unitarian Universalism's particular perspectives, resources, limits and possibilities. Students who do not identify as Unitarian Universalists will be encouraged to become acquainted with this expression of American progressive post-Christian Protestantism as a site in which theological issues critical to post-modern religious community can be engaged.
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).

ST 4019     3 Units
Minimum 5 Limit 15             PIN Required: Yes
Fireside Room

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
Friday 

No Friday courses are scheduled at this time.

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
Saturday 

No Saturday courses are scheduled at this time.

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

 
COMMUNITY AND PARISH FIELDWORK 

Community Fieldwork Fall
Gabriella Lettini


Community fieldwork Fieldwork includes work in gender, racial and economic justice, queer activism, disability advocacy, immigration issues, environmental responsibility, civil liberties protection, HIV response, youth at risk, peace building, participating in a fundraising campaign for a non for profit or grassroots organization and more. Please arrange with the professor.  Please note: this course does not indicate a specific time block at this time (TBA).

FE 4060     0 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25             PIN Required: Yes

Community Internship Fall
Gabriella Lettini


Community Internships involve supervised placements in a non-profit service agency or grassroots organization, hospice work, literacy counseling and more. Those who register for this course should also register for Community Intern Reflection Fall. Arrangements should be made with the professor.  Please note: this course does not indicate a specific time block at this time (TBA).

FE 4220     0 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25             PIN Required: Yes

Community Intern Reflection Fall
4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Mondays
Gabriella Lettini


All SKSM students involved in community internships will meet together for reflection on their work, as it is only through the processes of theological reflection and critical reflection on experience that field work becomes field education. This class is designed to broaden and to deepen students' analytic perspective on their field site contexts and on their roles as religious leaders and professionals. Students will be grow in their ability to think and learn in a praxis oriented way, that is, allowing situations of practice to deepen and challenge their academic knowledge about theo/alogies, and allowing their academic knowledge of theology to deepen and challenge their ministerial practice. In field-based experiences the depth of students’ learning depends entirely upon how well they can implement praxis oriented learning. Arrange with Instructor. Class will include conference calls and online work. All participants will be expected to attend a one day retreat day.
View the syllabus for this course (pdf).

FE 4222     2 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25             PIN Required: No
Round Chapel

MASC Project Fall
Gabriella Lettini


For SKSM Master of Arts in Religious Leadership for Social Change (MASC) students only.  MASC students should sign up for this class during the semesters when they are producing their final project representative of their learning during the program. Projects include research thesis, public presentations, designing and implementation of educational curricula, the organization of conferences and special events, artwork related to justice work and spirituality, and workshops.  A copy of the project will be placed in a public collection at the school. Please discuss with instructor. Please note: this course does not indicate a specific time block at this time (TBA).

MA 5300    0 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 15             PIN Required: No

Clinical Pastoral Education Fall
Gabriella Lettini


This is for Starr King Students engaged in part-time or full-time Clinical Pastoral Education.  Participate in ministry to persons, and in individual group reflection upon that ministry. Theoretical material from theology, the behavioral sciences, and pastoral care.  Integrates theological understanding and knowledge of behavioral science into pastoral functioning.  Upon completion, a written evaluation from the program supervisor will be placed into the student's permanent files.  Arrange with your advisor and the Director of Studies in Public Ministry. Final evaluation from CPE supervisor needs to be sent to faculty by the last day of the semester. Please note: this course does not indicate a specific time block at this time (TBA).

FE 4012     0 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 30             PIN Required: No

Congregational Fieldwork Fall
Kurt Kuhwald


Fieldwork in Unitarian Universalist congregations includes teaching a religious education class for children or adults, working with a youth group, participating in a stewardship campaign and more. Please arrange with the professor.

FE 4050     0 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25             PIN Required: Yes

Parish Internship Fall
Kurt Kuhwald


This is a 6-10 month full-time or part-time experience in a teaching congregation under the supervision of a Minister in final Fellowship, an intern committee, and a professor at the school.  Those who register for this course must also register for Parish Intern Reflection Spring.  Please note: this course does not indicate a specific time block at this time (TBA).

FE 4210     0 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25             PIN Required: Yes

Parish Intern Reflection Fall
Kurt Kuhwald


All Starr King students working as interns in Unitarian Universalist congregations are expected to participate in this time of reflection on their ministerial work. All participants will be expected to attend the Starr King Intern Gathering for two days TBD in January, 2012.  Please note: this course does not indicate a specific time block at this time (TBA).

FE 4212     2 Units
Minimum 1 Limit 25             PIN Required: Yes

In Thesis Fall
TBA


Please arrange with your advisor.

MA 5000    TBD Units
Minimum 1 Limit 30             PIN Required: Yes

 
Online | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday
Saturday | Community ⁄ Parish Fieldwork

 

2011-2012
Fall / Intersession / Spring / Summer / Online

2010-2011 (archived listings)
Fall / Intersession / Spring / Summer / Online

Click to view the Starr King catalog in PDF format. (Note: Seminary for the Laity certificate program is no longer offered.)

 

 


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