Spring 2015

Course Descriptions

Field Education

Clinical Pastoral Education Spring

This course is for Starr King students engaged in part-time or full-time Clinical Pastoral Education. Participate in ministry to persons, and in individual group reflection upon that ministry. Theoretical material from theology, the behavioral sciences, and pastoral care. Integrates theological understanding and knowledge of behavioral science into pastoral functioning. Upon completion, a written evaluation from the program supervisor will be placed into the student’s permanent files. Discuss first with your advisor and then faculty. Final evaluation from CPE supervisor needs to be sent to faculty by the last day of the semester to receive credit. Every year SKSM offers an orientation to CPE and to the application process; students are responsible for applying and securing a place in a CPE program. Please check the SKSM Student Handbook for more information.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Field Education

Location

Off-site

Course ID

FE 4012

Pin Required

No

Course Size

1 – 30

Units

1-10

Community Field Work Spring

Field work describes an involvement in community work for up to 15 hours a week with the ongoing support of a mentor. Community Field Work includes work in gender, racial and economic justice, queer activism, disability advocacy, immigration issues, environmental responsibility, civil liberties protection, HIV response, youth at risk, peace building, participating in a fundraising campaign for a non for profit or grassroots organization, chaplaincy, teaching and more. Students should discuss the field work opportunity with their advisor before making arrangements with the professor. Student and community mentor should discuss and sign a learning agreement before the official beginning of the field work experience. Midterm and final student/mentor evaluations will also be required by midterm and the last day of SKSM classes. All forms available from the professor at the beginning of the semester and on the SKSM Website. Please see Student Handbook for more information.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Field Education

Location

Off-site

Course ID

FE 4062

Pin Required

No

Course Size

1 – 30

Units

0.5-5

Community Internship Spring

Community Internships involve engagement at a field site from 16 to 40 hours a week, under weekly supervision at the site and the support of the SKSM Community Intern Reflection class (an integrative seminar). Community Internships include a variety of settings, such as supervised placements in a non-profit service agency or grassroots organization, hospice work, chaplaincy, teaching and more. They can also entail creating new projects such as starting a new organization or planning a national conference with a board of mentors. Those who register for this course should also register for Community Intern Integrative Reflection Spring. Students should discuss the internship with their advisor before making arrangements with the professor. Student and supervisor/mentors should discuss and sign a learning agreement before the official beginning of the internship. Midterm and final student/supervisor evaluations will also be required by midterm and the last day of SKSM classes. All forms available from the professor at the beginning of the semester and SKSM Website. Please see Student Handbook for more information.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Field Education

Location

Off-site

Course ID

FE 4221

Pin Required

Yes

Course Size

1 – 30

Units

5-10

Congregational Fieldwork SP

Fieldwork in Unitarian Universalist congregations may include teaching a religious education class for children or adults, working with a youth group, participating in a stewardship campaign and/or more. Please arrange with the professor.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Field Education

Location

Off-site

Course ID

FE 4052

Pin Required

No

Course Size

1 – 5

Units

1-5

Parish Internship Reflection SP

All Starr King students serving as ministerial interns in Unitarian Universalist congregations are expected to participate in regularly scheduled times of reflection on their ministerial work and the work of their intern colleagues. Participation in a two day gathering of interns and teaching ministers at the School is essential.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Field Education

Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)

Course ID

FE 4213

Pin Required

No

Course Size

1 – 15

Units

2

Parish Internship Spring

This is a 9 month full-time (one year) or an 18 month part-time (two year) experience in a teaching congregation under the supervision of a Minister in final Fellowship with the UUA, an intern committee, and a professor at the school. Those who register for this course must also register for Parish Intern Reflection Spring.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Field Education

Location

Off-site

Course ID

FE 4211

Pin Required

No

Course Size

1 – 15

Units

5-10

Immersion

No courses found

Intensive

No courses found

Online

Eco-Theologies

As theologians rooted in Judeo-Christian religious traditions have responded to the complex nexus of the injustices of ecological crises and social inequities, a variety of critical and constructive theologies have emerged. This course explores contemporary eco-theologies, including ecofeminist, ecowomanist, queer eco-theologies, and Native American theologies of creation. Each student will research one current ecological issue as a conversation partner for the theologies we will study. We will also be asking questions about the implications of these theological projects for liturgical practices, congregational mission, and the students’ own constructive theological work where applicable. Weekly reading and regular online participation in Moodle’s discussion board, periodic group work via synchronistic online tools, two synthesis papers, and a final project are required.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Online

Location

Online

Course ID

CEST 8450

Pin Required

Yes

Course Size

3 – 15

Units

3

Download

Global Religious Traditions

This course will examine the major global religions from a cross-cultural, multi-religious perspective. Taking into consideration that a course that explores many religions cannot be comprehensive, we will consider the religions from a thematic perspective by analyzing fundamental beliefs and practices in the various religious traditions. In addition, we will also examine assumptions underlying the discipline of religious studies. Students will engage through weekly readings and forum discussion, as well as other interactive learning activities, as part of the online learning community. Students of all faiths and backgrounds are invited and encouraged to enroll.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Online

Location

Online

Course ID

HR 8401

Pin Required

Yes

Course Size

5 – 20

Units

3

Download

Illness, Health & Healing (Part 2)

Illness is both soul-shaking and soul-evoking for the patient and for all others for whom the patient matters.  We lose an innocence, we know vulnerability, we are no longer who we were before this event, and we will never be the same.  We are in uncharted terrain, and there is no turning back.  Illness is a profound soul event, and yet this is virtually ignored and unaddressed.

– Jean Shinoda Bolen, Close to the Bone

Illness, Health & Healing is a two-semester online course in which students  (1) listen deeply to the voices of the ill and their caregivers;  (2) explore ways of fostering health and healing in their congregations and communities; and (3) develop practices to aid in their own healing and well-being.

During the Spring of 2015 students will focus on poetry, illness and pastoral care.  Students will work with healing stories, both contemporary and ancient, from a multi-religious perspective, and craft their own.  They will develop and/or deepen their pastoral skills and personal spiritual practices through weekly exercises.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Online

Location

Online

Course ID

PS 8450

Pin Required

Yes

Course Size

8 – 24

Units

1.5

Download

Leadership for Social Change: Theory and Practice

Open to all, and geared toward those engaged in community organizing, activist, social work, and nonprofit settings; also a foundational course for students in the MASC (MA in Social Change) program. Topics include visionary leadership, assessing organizational and community needs, social movement history, coalition building, power and identity, theological reflection, spiritual and emotional care for social change agents, and more. This interactive online course combines web technologies with an in-person praxis (action/reflection) component to deliver a dynamic distance learning experience for social change practitioners around the world. Participants will engage in academic scholarship, professional development, and spiritual practice responding to their particular interests, gifts, and challenges. Students will build a classroom community for peer reflection and support, while articulating and advancing their unique goals for their own learning and leadership in social change.

Session

Spring 2015

Course Type

Online

Location

Online

Course ID

RSFT-8418

Pin Required

Yes

Course Size

5 – 15

Units

3

Download

Queer Liberation Theologies: Latin American, Asian, and African Contexts

What does “liberation” mean to queer individuals and communities? How do Christian traditions worldwide relate to queer issues and queer believers? For the last twenty years queer theologians and communities have been developing contextual theologies in order to challenge and critique the ingrained heteronormativity in theological thought, spiritual practices, and institutional governance. Drawing from an interdisciplinary perspective, the course aims to examine and explore the development of queer theologies in the specific contexts of Asia, Africa and Latin America. The focus of the course is intentionally non-US centered in order to offer future ministers, scholars, and activists tools to collaborate and interact with experiences, key topics and thinkers within the complex and yet fascinating world of queer liberation theologies, thus, enriching their worldview and praxis glocally.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Online

Location

Online

Course ID

HRRS 8420

Pin Required

Yes

Course Size

3 – 20

Units

3

Download

SKSM and Institute of Buddhist Studies: Our Co-Sponsored Courses Spring 2015

These courses are co-sponsored by the Institute for Buddhist Studies and Starr King School for the Ministry.

During Spring 2015, the Institute of Buddhist Studies will offer the following courses. Please note ~ we participate in the same GTU registration periods. To register for an IBS course, follow the same instructions as registering for a Starr King course. See How to Register. Most, but not all, IBS courses do not require a PIN, so pay close attention when registering. View IBS Spring 2015 Online Course listings (please check back if necessary).

  • Topics in Japanese Religion: Japanese Religious Landscape, Grumbach
  • Topics in Buddhist Traditions of Japan:  Teachings of Zen Master Dogen, Leighton
  • Psychological Aspects of Buddhism III, Bermant

Again, the Institute of Buddhist Studies and Starr King School have different requirements for registration. For example, SKSM does not accept auditors, while some IBS courses do allow auditors. Please check course descriptions carefully before registering.

Session

Spring

Instructors

TBD

Course Type

Online

Location

Online

Pin Required

TBD

Unitarian Universalist History

This course begins with an examination of the (alleged) antecedents to Unitarianism and Universalism in pre-Reformation Europe. We begin with development of Unitarianism in Poland, Transylvania, and England, then on to that of North American Unitarianism through its classical age, the Transcendentalist development, and the various crises of identity and purpose that develop into and through the late 19th and 20th centuries. Then we turn our attention to Universalist ascendency, decline, and then consolidation with Unitarianism. Careful attention will be paid throughout to the Unitarian/Universalist social location in relationship to class, race, and gender identities, and how these sometimes enabled and sometimes impaired social justice advances.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Online

Location

Online

Course ID

HSFT 8462

Pin Required

Yes

Course Size

5 – 30

Units

3

Download

Residential

Aesthetics of the Oppressed

Aesthetics of the Oppressed is the term that Augusto Boal used to refer to the full spectrum of cultural and artistic activities that a community develops to resist, challenge and transform oppression. Building on the foundations of Theater of the Oppressed (TO) and the Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Aesthetics of the Oppressed recuperates the power of art and theater “to liberate both oppressor and oppressed” and “recover our deepest humanity” through creativity, art, dialogue and education. This course will build on the curriculum of Introduction to Theater of the Oppressed (RSED 4036), while also integrating writing, spoken word/poetry, visual arts, dance, music, architecture & sculpture to develop a fluid, liberatory poesis & praxis between and across different art forms. There will be a focus on deepening the techniques and practices as practitioner/facilitator/educator/activist, refining the aesthetics and artistry of the work, while expanding the range, depth, and scope of theoretical analysis and political action and engagement. Participants will be required to work in the community or with an institution, using their TO/Aesthetics of the Oppressed techniques to give workshops, or engage in an externship that uses TO or other related skills.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Residential

Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)

Room

Fireside Room

Days

W

Time

7:10pm-9:40pm

Course ID

RSED 4037

Pin Required

No

Course Size

6 – 30

Units

3

Download

Community Internship Integrative Reflection Seminar Spring

All SKSM students involved in community internships will meet together for reflection on their work, as it is only through the processes of theological reflection and critical reflection on experience that field work becomes field education. This class includes readings, discussions and writings and is designed to broaden and to deepen students’ analytic perspective on their field site contexts and on their roles as religious leaders and professionals. Students will be grow in their ability to think and learn in a praxis oriented way, that is, allowing situations of practice to deepen and challenge their academic knowledge about theo/alogies, and allowing their academic knowledge of theology to deepen and challenge their practice of leadership. In field-based experiences the depth of students’ learning depends entirely upon how well they can implement praxis oriented learning. Limited Skype (Virtual) attendance allowed.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Residential, Residential Hybrid

Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)

Room

Fireside Room

Days

T

Time

4:00pm-5:30pm

Course ID

FE 4223

Pin Required

No

Course Size

1 – 25

Units

2

Introduction to Islam

This experiential course is an introduction to the history and theology of Islam. It will introduce the student to Islamic religious teaching and practices. It will explore the diversities of Islam among Sunni, Shi’a and Sufi groups from multiple cultural perspectives. Students will be invited to participate in spiritual practice and community events in hopes that the combination of study and practical experience will deepen their experience.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Residential

Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)

Days

M

Time

2:10pm-5:00pm

Course ID

HR 4822

Pin Required

No

Course Size

8 – 15

Units

3

Download

Mormon Women and Power

“Mormon women have had the priesthood since 1843.” –D. Michael Quinn, 1992. In this seminar, students with instructor examine the complex issues of women and power throughout Mormon history. Topics include women’s suffrage existing in Utah before most U.S. states, institutional patriarchy of the modern Mormon Church and religion, the doctrine of Mother in Heaven, Women’s Relief Society, women’s relationships with polygamy, and women’s ordination. Course is taught by Doctoral student Michelle Mueller with a GTU Newhall award, under the mentorship of Dr. Farajajé. This course is HYBRID (Residential w/Skype participation).

Session

Spring 2015

Course Type

Residential, Residential Hybrid

Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)

Room

Fireside Room

Days

M

Time

9:40am-12:30pm

Course ID

HR-4002

Pin Required

Yes

Course Size

3 – 12

Units

3

Download

Preach It!

Every would-be religious leader must learn to speak from the heart, from personal experience, and yet with full appreciation for the audience, the occasion, and the necessary message. Despite the difficulties of life and the realities of injustice we must bring something akin to ‘good news’ to the weary. This experiential course will encourage practices that contribute to conceiving, developing, writing and extemporizing sermons and other public utterances grounded in personal authenticity, full of moral authority, and aimed at transformative effectiveness. The instructor has led the UUA, congregations in every part of the US, taught the practice of ministry in multiple seminaries — and written a number of books, none of which will be assigned! Humor, self-awareness, presence, and persuasive power will be the hallmarks of this course in practical homiletics.

 

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Residential

Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)

Room

Fireside Room

Days

Th

Time

9:40am-12:30pm

Course ID

HM 4005

Pin Required

Yes

Course Size

4 – 12

Units

3

Download

Unitarianism in Transylvania

This course will focus on the history of the Unitarians in Transylvania and Central Eastern Europe from the development of the antitrinitarian movement to the last quarter of the 20th Century. The lecture-discussion course examines the ecclesiastical and political changes regarding Transylvanian Unitarianism. Covering four centuries of history the participants will have the possibility to understand the religious and ethnical pluralism of the Land beyond the forests, and the uniqueness of Unitarianism in Europe.  This residential course will be held at SKSM Fireside Room with Skype participation.

Session

Spring 2015

Course Type

Residential, Residential Hybrid

Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)

Room

Reading Room

Days

W

Time

2:00pm-5:00pm

Course ID

HS 4005

Pin Required

No

Course Size

5 – 15

Units

3

Download

Residential Hybrid

Bending the Arc: Effective Justice Ministries

In the face of profound climate disruption and racial and economic inequality, people of faith are called be change agents, co-creators of more equitable, sustainable and life-giving communities. However, our capacity to make a difference may fall short of our ideals. How does change occur, for individuals and larger systems? What particular gifts can faith communities and leaders bring to this work? How can our justice ministries be more effective, meaningful and sustainable? Students in this class will: 1) engage with different theories of change, 2) learn from historic and current movements for justice, 3) get acquainted with Unitarian Universalist, interfaith, faith/labor, legislative, and organizing networks, and 4) develop practical skills needed to inspire, organize, analyze, structure, resource, sustain, and pastor effective justice ministries.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Residential Hybrid

Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)

Room

Fireside Room

Days

T

Time

2:10 PM- 5:00 PM

Course ID

RSFT-2130-01

Pin Required

Yes

Course Size

6 – 20

Units

3

Community Internship Integrative Reflection Seminar Spring

All SKSM students involved in community internships will meet together for reflection on their work, as it is only through the processes of theological reflection and critical reflection on experience that field work becomes field education. This class includes readings, discussions and writings and is designed to broaden and to deepen students’ analytic perspective on their field site contexts and on their roles as religious leaders and professionals. Students will be grow in their ability to think and learn in a praxis oriented way, that is, allowing situations of practice to deepen and challenge their academic knowledge about theo/alogies, and allowing their academic knowledge of theology to deepen and challenge their practice of leadership. In field-based experiences the depth of students’ learning depends entirely upon how well they can implement praxis oriented learning. Limited Skype (Virtual) attendance allowed.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Residential, Residential Hybrid

Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)

Room

Fireside Room

Days

T

Time

4:00pm-5:30pm

Course ID

FE 4223

Pin Required

No

Course Size

1 – 25

Units

2

Mormon Women and Power

“Mormon women have had the priesthood since 1843.” –D. Michael Quinn, 1992. In this seminar, students with instructor examine the complex issues of women and power throughout Mormon history. Topics include women’s suffrage existing in Utah before most U.S. states, institutional patriarchy of the modern Mormon Church and religion, the doctrine of Mother in Heaven, Women’s Relief Society, women’s relationships with polygamy, and women’s ordination. Course is taught by Doctoral student Michelle Mueller with a GTU Newhall award, under the mentorship of Dr. Farajajé. This course is HYBRID (Residential w/Skype participation).

Session

Spring 2015

Course Type

Residential, Residential Hybrid

Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)

Room

Fireside Room

Days

M

Time

9:40am-12:30pm

Course ID

HR-4002

Pin Required

Yes

Course Size

3 – 12

Units

3

Download

Unitarianism in Transylvania

This course will focus on the history of the Unitarians in Transylvania and Central Eastern Europe from the development of the antitrinitarian movement to the last quarter of the 20th Century. The lecture-discussion course examines the ecclesiastical and political changes regarding Transylvanian Unitarianism. Covering four centuries of history the participants will have the possibility to understand the religious and ethnical pluralism of the Land beyond the forests, and the uniqueness of Unitarianism in Europe.  This residential course will be held at SKSM Fireside Room with Skype participation.

Session

Spring 2015

Course Type

Residential, Residential Hybrid

Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)

Room

Reading Room

Days

W

Time

2:00pm-5:00pm

Course ID

HS 4005

Pin Required

No

Course Size

5 – 15

Units

3

Download

Thesis/Final Project

MASC Project Spring

For SKSM Master of Arts in Social Change (MASC) students only. MASC students can split this course over two semesters or sign up for it during their last semester. This final project can take a variety of forms and should be representative of the student’s learning and creative work in the MASC degree. Projects include research thesis, public presentations, designing and implementing educational curricula, organizing local/national conferences and special events, multimedia art-work, writing a book and more. The thesis topic, proposal and final draft need to be discussed and developed with the faculty. The project can have a public presentation. A total of 3 MASC Project credits are required for graduation in the MASC degree. Please discuss with instructor.

Session

Spring 2015

Instructors

Course Type

Thesis/Final Project

Location

Starr King Campus (Berkeley, CA)

Course ID

MA 5300

Pin Required

Yes

Course Size

1 – 15

Units

1-3